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Global Climate Change and Freshwater Ecosystems

  • Penelope Firth
  • Stuart G. Fisher

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xi
  2. Joel S. Levine
    Pages 1-25
  3. Dennis E. Ford, Kent W. Thornton
    Pages 26-47
  4. Amelia K. Ward, G. Milton Ward, John Harlin, Rona Donahoe
    Pages 116-142
  5. Bernard W. Sweeney, John K. Jackson, J. Denis Newbold, David H. Funk
    Pages 143-176
  6. Judy L. Meyer, William M. Pulliam
    Pages 177-191
  7. M. W. Oswood, A. M. Milner, J. G. Irons III
    Pages 192-210
  8. Nancy B. Grimm, Stuart G. Fisher
    Pages 211-233
  9. Emily H. Stanley, H. Maurice Valett
    Pages 234-249
  10. Clifford N. Dahm, Manuel C. Molles Jr.
    Pages 250-260
  11. Dale A. Bruns, G. Bruce Wiersma, G. Wayne Minshall
    Pages 285-307
  12. Back Matter
    Pages 319-321

About these proceedings

Introduction

Global climate change is a certainty. The Earth's climate has never remained static for long and the prospect for human-accelerated climate change in the near future appears likely. Freshwater systems are intimately connected to climate in several ways: they may influence global atmospheric processes affecting climate; they may be sensitive early indicators of climate change because they integrate the atmospheric and terrestrial events occurring in their catchments; and, of course, they will be affected by climate change. An improved predictive understanding of environmental effects on pattern and process in freshwater ecosystems will be invaluable as a baseline upon which to build sound protection and management policies for fresh waters. This book represents an early step towards this improved understanding. The contributors accepted the challenge to assume global warming of 2-5oC in the next century. They then explored the implications of this scenario on various freshwater ecosystems and processes. To provide a broader perspective, Firth and Fisher included several chapters which do not deal expressly with freshwater ecosystems, but rather discuss climate change in terms of causes and mechanisms, implications for water resources, and the use of remote sensing as a tool for expanding studies from local to global scale.

Keywords

climate climate change ecosystem environment global warming

Editors and affiliations

  • Penelope Firth
    • 1
  • Stuart G. Fisher
    • 2
  1. 1.Biotic Systems and Resources DivisionNational Science FoundationUSA
  2. 2.Department of ZoologyArizona State UniversityTempeUSA

Bibliographic information