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Brain Ischemia

  • Eugene Gusev
  • Veronica I. Skvortsova

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xiv
  2. Introduction

    1. Eugene Gusev, Veronica I. Skvortsova
      Pages 1-5
  3. Mechanisms of Ischemic Brain Damage

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 7-7
    2. Eugene Gusev, Veronica I. Skvortsova
      Pages 21-29
    3. Eugene Gusev, Veronica I. Skvortsova
      Pages 31-37
    4. Eugene Gusev, Veronica I. Skvortsova
      Pages 39-93
    5. Eugene Gusev, Veronica I. Skvortsova
      Pages 95-99
    6. Eugene Gusev, Veronica I. Skvortsova
      Pages 101-102
    7. Eugene Gusev, Veronica I. Skvortsova
      Pages 147-182
    8. Eugene Gusev, Veronica I. Skvortsova
      Pages 183-205
    9. Eugene Gusev, Veronica I. Skvortsova
      Pages 219-226
  4. Neuroprotection in Brain Ischemia

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 227-227
    2. Eugene Gusev, Veronica I. Skvortsova
      Pages 237-284
    3. Eugene Gusev, Veronica I. Skvortsova
      Pages 285-351
    4. Eugene Gusev, Veronica I. Skvortsova
      Pages 353-368
    5. Eugene Gusev, Veronica I. Skvortsova
      Pages 377-378
  5. Back Matter
    Pages 379-392

About this book

Introduction

Ischemia is localized tissue anemia due to obstruction of the inflow of arterial blood, thus brain ischemia is the condition where insufficient blood is delivered to the brain. Many physiological processes occurring in the brain critically depend on the state of its energy metabolism. The state of brain energy metabolism in turn depends on the delivery of oxygen and glucose to the brain via the bloodstream. Although it comprises only 2% of the total body weight, the human brain consumes 20-25% of the oxygen and up to 70% of the free glucose taken in by the body. The brain respires more intensively than any other organ of the body. The intensity of oxygen consumption by cortical brain tissue much exceeds the demands of other tissues (5.43 mmol 02/g per h versus 3.06 and 4.02 mmol for heart at rest and intensively working, respectively, 2.4 mmol for kidneys, and 1.8 mmol for liver). Oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria generates 95% of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) that is formed in the brain. Thus, it is clear why insufficiency of oxygen delivery to brain cells adversely affects brain function. Glucose is the main energy-providing substrate in the brain. The basic pathway of its metabolism in neural tissue is aerobic glycolysis.

Keywords

brain death depression glutamate receptor neuropeptides neuroprotection oxidative stress receptor stroke

Authors and affiliations

  • Eugene Gusev
    • 1
  • Veronica I. Skvortsova
    • 1
  1. 1.Russian State Medical UniversityMoscowRussia

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-9248-2
  • Copyright Information Springer Science+Business Media New York 2003
  • Publisher Name Springer, Boston, MA
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-1-4613-4857-3
  • Online ISBN 978-1-4419-9248-2
  • Buy this book on publisher's site