Front Line Surgery

A Practical Approach

  • Matthew J. Martin
  • Alec C. Beekley

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xxii
  2. Ian Wedmore
    Pages 1-16
  3. John J. Lammie, Joseph G. Kotora Jr., Jamie C. Riesberg
    Pages 17-31
  4. Alec C. Beekley
    Pages 33-45
  5. John B. Holcomb, Timothy C. Nunez
    Pages 47-58
  6. Matthew J. Martin
    Pages 59-66
  7. Benjamin Harrison
    Pages 67-81
  8. Eric K. Johnson, Scott R. Steele
    Pages 83-98
  9. Brian Eastridge, Lorne Blackbourne
    Pages 99-113
  10. Carlos V. R. Brown
    Pages 129-140
  11. Niten Singh
    Pages 141-154
  12. Craig D. Shriver, Amy Vertrees
    Pages 155-169
  13. Jeffrey A. Bailey
    Pages 171-181
  14. Michael S. Meyer, Matthew J. Martin
    Pages 183-198
  15. Keith A. Havenstrite
    Pages 199-212
  16. Alec C. Beekley
    Pages 229-237
  17. Peter Rhee, Maj. Joe DuBose
    Pages 239-255
  18. Richard C. Rooney
    Pages 257-267

About this book

Introduction

Front Line Surgery is designed to provide practical insights for surgeons whose areas of practice demand quick best-outcome based solutions to complex and urgent clinical problems. Both editors are active duty officers and surgeons with multiple tours in Iraq. Each chapter provides detailed instructions and combat/emergency surgical principles with multiple detailed illustrations. While the focus is clearly clinical, the authors also provide clinical pearls in both traditional and non-traditional narrative. Top Ten Combat Trauma Lessons 1. Patients die in the ER, and 2. Patients die in the CT scanner; 3. Therefore, a hypotensive trauma patient belongs in the operating room ASAP. 4. Most blown up or shot patients need blood products, not crystalloid. Avoid trying “hypotensive resuscitation” – it’s for civilian trauma. 5. For mangled extremities and amputations, one code red (4 PRBC + 2 FFP) per extremity, started as soon as they arrive. 6. Patients in extremis will code during rapid sequence intubation, be prepared, and intubate these patients in the OR (not in the ER) whenever possible. 7. This hospital can go from empty to full in a matter of hours; don’t be lulled by the slow periods. 8. The name of the game here is not continuity of care, it is throughput. If the ICU or wards are full, you are mission incapable. 9. MASCALs live or die by proper triage and prioritization – starting at the door and including which x-rays to get, labs, and disposition. 10. No Personal Projects!!! They clog the system, waste resources, and anger others. See #8 above. Reprinted from "The Volume of Experience (January 2008 edition)", a document written and continuously updated by U.S. Army trauma surgeons working at the Ibn Sina Hospital, Baghdad, Iraq.

Keywords

combat surgery disaster recovery trauma surgery

Editors and affiliations

  • Matthew J. Martin
    • 1
  • Alec C. Beekley
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Surgery, Madigan Army Medical CenterTrauma Medical DirectorTacomaUSA
  2. 2.Uniformed Services, Staff General SurgeonAssistant Professor of SurgeryTacomaUSA

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-6079-5
  • Copyright Information Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011
  • Publisher Name Springer, New York, NY
  • eBook Packages Medicine
  • Print ISBN 978-1-4419-6078-8
  • Online ISBN 978-1-4419-6079-5
  • About this book