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Design Driven Testing

Test Smarter, Not Harder

  • Authors
  • Matt Stephens
  • Doug Rosenberg

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xviii
  2. DDT vs. TDD

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 1-2
    2. Matt Stephens, Doug Rosenberg
      Pages 3-16
    3. Matt Stephens, Doug Rosenberg
      Pages 17-42
    4. Matt Stephens, Doug Rosenberg
      Pages 43-77
  3. DDT in the Real World: Mapplet 2.0 Travel Web Site

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 79-80
    2. Matt Stephens, Doug Rosenberg
      Pages 81-107
    3. Matt Stephens, Doug Rosenberg
      Pages 109-136
    4. Matt Stephens, Doug Rosenberg
      Pages 137-162
    5. Matt Stephens, Doug Rosenberg
      Pages 163-182
    6. Matt Stephens, Doug Rosenberg
      Pages 183-200
  4. Advanced DDT

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 201-202
    2. Matt Stephens, Doug Rosenberg
      Pages 203-226
    3. Matt Stephens, Doug Rosenberg
      Pages 227-252
    4. Matt Stephens, Doug Rosenberg
      Pages 253-276
    5. Matt Stephens, Doug Rosenberg
      Pages 277-307
  5. Back Matter
    Pages 309-344

About this book

Introduction

The groundbreaking book Design Driven Testing brings sanity back to the software development process by flipping around the concept of Test Driven Development (TDD)—restoring the concept of using testing to verify a design instead of pretending that unit tests are a replacement for design. Anyone who feels that TDD is “Too Damn Difficult” will appreciate this book.

Design Driven Testing shows that, by combining a forward-thinking development process with cutting-edge automation, testing can be a finely targeted, business-driven, rewarding effort. In other words, you’ll learn how to test smarter, not harder.

  • Applies a feedback-driven approach to each stage of the project lifecycle.
  • Illustrates a lightweight and effective approach using a core subset of UML.
  • Follows a real-life example project using Java and Flex/ActionScript.
  • Presents bonus chapters for advanced DDTers covering unit-test antipatterns (and their opposite, “test-conscious” design patterns), and showing how to create your own test transformation templates in Enterprise Architect.

Keywords

Java Unified Modeling Language (UML) Unit Tests algorithm algorithms control design pattern programming use case

Bibliographic information