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From Research to Manuscript

A Guide to Scientific Writing

  • Book
  • © 2009
  • Latest edition

Overview

  • Clearly written, comprehensive instruction manual for turning research into a paper
  • Contains specific examples from well-written research papers in a wide variety of fields
  • Goes beyond formatting rules by explaining how to translate data into succinct, meaningful figures and text
  • Offers advice to speakers of other languages
  • Explains the effective use of tables, graphs, statistics, and figures
  • Demonstrates the step-by-step construction of the Introduction and Discussion sections of research papers
  • Includes practical advice on preparing a manuscript for submission and then responding to reviewers’ comments
  • Includes tools and techniques for structuring the sentences, paragraphs, and sections of a research paper

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About this book

Observations Plus Recipes It has been said that science is the orderly collection of facts about the natural world. Scientists, however, are wary of using the word ‘fact. ’ ‘Fact’ has the feeling of absoluteness and universality, whereas scientific observations are neither ab- lute nor universal. For example, ‘children have 20 deciduous [baby] teeth’ is an observation about the real world, but scientists would not call it a fact. Some children have fewer deciduous teeth, and some have more. Even those children who have exactly 20 deciduous teeth use the full set during only a part of their childhood. When they are babies and t- dlers, children have less than 20 visible teeth, and as they grow older, children begin to loose their deciduous teeth, which are then replaced by permanent teeth. ‘Children have 20 deciduous [baby] teeth’ is not even a complete scientific sta- ment. For one thing, the statement ‘children have 20 deciduous teeth’ does not tell us what we mean by ‘teeth. ’ When we say “teeth,” do we mean only those that can seen be with the unaided eye, or do we also include the hidden, unerupted teeth? An observation such as ‘children have 20 deciduous teeth’ is not a fact, and, by itself, it is not acceptable as a scientific statement until its terms are explained: scientifically, ‘children have 20 deciduous teeth’ must be accompanied by definitions and qualifiers.

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Table of contents (11 chapters)

  1. Writing a Research Paper

  2. Preparing a Manuscript for Submission

Reviews

"Compulsory reading for post-docs wanting to achieve success in the scientific field." (Ronan Bree, National University of Ireland, Galway)

"A great addition to the personal libraries of graduate students and postdoctoral fellows bent on careers in science. Many seasoned scientists could also be advised to read the book to improve their skills in writing." (Donald K. Ingram, Editor-in-Chief of AGE)

"Overall, Katz provides a pleasant overview of the research-science report process for both first-time science research authors and seasoned professionals." (Julie Kinyoun, Technical Communication, Vol. 54 (2), 2007)

"... another excellent book to treasure." (Dr. Achuthsankar S. Nair, University of Kerala)

Authors and Affiliations

  • Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, USA

    Michael Jay Katz

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