Valuing Oil Spill Prevention

A Case Study of California’s Central Coast

  • Richard T. Carson
  • Michael B. Conaway
  • W. Michael Hanemann
  • Jon A. Krosnick
  • Robert C. Mitchell
  • Stanley Presser

Part of the The Economics of Non-Market Goods and Resources book series (ENGO, volume 5)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-x
  2. Richard T. Carson, Michael B. Conaway, W. Michael Hanemann, Jon A. Krosnick, Robert C. Mitchell, Stanley Presser
    Pages 1-8
  3. Richard T. Carson, Michael B. Conaway, W. Michael Hanemann, Jon A. Krosnick, Robert C. Mitchell, Stanley Presser
    Pages 9-25
  4. Richard T. Carson, Michael B. Conaway, W. Michael Hanemann, Jon A. Krosnick, Robert C. Mitchell, Stanley Presser
    Pages 27-50
  5. Richard T. Carson, Michael B. Conaway, W. Michael Hanemann, Jon A. Krosnick, Robert C. Mitchell, Stanley Presser
    Pages 51-57
  6. Richard T. Carson, Michael B. Conaway, W. Michael Hanemann, Jon A. Krosnick, Robert C. Mitchell, Stanley Presser
    Pages 59-79
  7. Richard T. Carson, Michael B. Conaway, W. Michael Hanemann, Jon A. Krosnick, Robert C. Mitchell, Stanley Presser
    Pages 81-110
  8. Back Matter
    Pages 111-257

About this book

Introduction

On April 22-23, 1988, approximately 432,000 gallons of San Joaquin Valley crude oil spilled from an aboveground storage tank at a Shell Oil Company refinery into the surrounding environment, including the northern reaches of San Francisco Bay (the Martinez spill). Pursuant to the settlement of the resulting litigation (United States/California v. Shell Oil Co., No. C89-4220, (N.D. Cal1990)), Shell Oil Company provided funding for, among other things, studies to improve future response strategies to oil spills and ensure better restoration of resources and services affected by such spills. The California Oil Spill Contingent Valuation Study was one of the studies funded by the settlement. The purpose of the California Oil Spill (COS) Contingent Valuation (CV) Study was "to execute and document a contingent valuation study of natural resource damages associated with offshore, coastal, or estuarine oil spills in California" (State of California, Department of Justice, Contract Number 89-2126). The COS CV study developed an estimate of per household ex ante economic value for a program to prevent a specified set of natural resource injuries to those species of birds and intertidal life that are consistently affected by oil spills along California's Central Coast. The principal investigators on the COS study team were Richard T. Carson of the University of California, San Diego, and W. Michael Hanemann of the University of California, Berkeley. The study's project manager was Kerry M.

Keywords

USA assessment design development environment evaluation prevention research service university valuation value-at-risk

Authors and affiliations

  • Richard T. Carson
    • 1
  • Michael B. Conaway
    • 2
  • W. Michael Hanemann
    • 3
  • Jon A. Krosnick
    • 4
  • Robert C. Mitchell
    • 5
  • Stanley Presser
    • 6
  1. 1.University of CaliforniaSan DiegoUSA
  2. 2.University of AlabamaUSA
  3. 3.University of CaliforniaBerkeleyUSA
  4. 4.Ohio State UniversityUSA
  5. 5.Clark UniversityUSA
  6. 6.University of MarylandUSA

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4020-2864-9
  • Copyright Information Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2004
  • Publisher Name Springer, Dordrecht
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-94-017-3636-7
  • Online ISBN 978-1-4020-2864-9
  • Series Print ISSN 1571-487X
  • About this book