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The Death of Argument

Fallacies in Agent Based Reasoning

  • John Woods

Part of the Applied Logic Series book series (APLS, volume 32)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xxvii
  2. Metatheoretical Questions

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 1-1
    2. John Woods
      Pages 3-23
    3. John Woods
      Pages 25-42
    4. John Woods
      Pages 43-61
  3. Threats and Intimidation

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 63-63
    2. John Woods
      Pages 65-73
    3. John Woods
      Pages 75-94
  4. Arguments Involving Reference to Persons

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 95-95
    2. John Woods
      Pages 97-110
    3. John Woods
      Pages 111-123
    4. John Woods
      Pages 125-148
  5. Pragma-Dialectics

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 149-149
    2. John Woods
      Pages 151-159
    3. John Woods
      Pages 161-170
    4. John Woods
      Pages 171-182
  6. Intractable Disagreement

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 183-183
    2. John Woods
      Pages 185-199
    3. John Woods
      Pages 201-216
  7. How to Interpret Arguments

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 217-217
    2. John Woods
      Pages 219-238
    3. John Woods
      Pages 239-250
  8. Analogy

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 251-251
    2. John Woods
      Pages 253-272
    3. John Woods
      Pages 273-298
  9. Induction

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 299-299
    2. John Woods
      Pages 301-310
    3. John Woods
      Pages 311-334
    4. John Woods
      Pages 335-347
    5. John Woods
      Pages 349-358
  10. Back Matter
    Pages 359-378

About this book

Introduction

The present work is a fair record of work I've done on the fallacies and related matters in the fifteen years since 1986. The book may be seen as a sequel to Fallacies: Selected papers 1972-1982, which I wrote with Douglas Walton, and which appeared in 1989 with Foris. This time I am on my own. Douglas Walton has, long since, found his own voice, as the saying has it; and so have I. Both of us greatly value the time we spent performing duets, but we also recognize the attractions of solo work. If I had to characterize the difference that has manifested itself in our later work, I would venture that Walton has strayed more, and I less, from what has come to be called the Woods-Walton Approach to the study of fallacies. Perhaps, on reflection "stray" is not the word for it, inasmuch as Walton's deviation from and my fidelity to the WWA are serious matters of methodological principle. The WWA was always conceived of as a way of handling the analysis of various kinds of fallacious argument or reasoning. It was a response to a particular challenge [Hamblin, 1970]. The challenge was that since logicians had allowed the investigation of fallacious reasoning to fall into disgraceful disarray, it was up to them to put things right. Accordingly, the WWA sought these repairs amidst the rich pluralisms of logic in the 1970s and beyond.

Keywords

Argumentation Theory cognitive psychology discourse formal logic linguistics logic science

Authors and affiliations

  • John Woods
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.The Abductive Systems GroupUniversity of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada
  2. 2.Department of Computer ScienceKing’s CollegeLondonEngland
  3. 3.Department of PhilosophyUniversity of LethbridgeCanada

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4020-2712-3
  • Copyright Information Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2004
  • Publisher Name Springer, Dordrecht
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-90-481-6700-5
  • Online ISBN 978-1-4020-2712-3
  • Series Print ISSN 1386-2790
  • Buy this book on publisher's site