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Palgrave Macmillan

Non-Market Socialism in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries

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  • © 1987

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About this book

Everyone knows that in socialism private companies are replaced by state enterprises which employ wage-workers in order to produce profits which accrue to the state. 'Not so!' say the authors of this book. In the nineteenth century, socialists as different as Marx and Kropotkin were agreed that socialism means a marketless, moneyless, wageless, classless, stateless world society. Subsequently this vision of non-market socialism has been developed by currents such as the Anarcho-Communists, Impossibilists, Council Communists, Bordigists and Situationists. By tracing this development, this book challenges the assumptions of both supporters and opponents of what is conventionally regarded as socialism.

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Table of contents (9 chapters)

Editors and Affiliations

  • University of York, UK

    John Crump

Bibliographic Information

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