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Monitors of Organic Chemicals in the Environment

Semipermeable Membrane Devices

  • James N. Huckins
  • Kees Booij
  • Jimmie D. Petty

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages I-XV
  2. James N. Huckins, Kees Booij, Jimmie D. Petty
    Pages 1-28
  3. James N. Huckins, Kees Booij, Jimmie D. Petty
    Pages 29-43
  4. James N. Huckins, Kees Booij, Jimmie D. Petty
    Pages 45-85
  5. James N. Huckins, Kees Booij, Jimmie D. Petty
    Pages 87-99
  6. James N. Huckins, Kees Booij, Jimmie D. Petty
    Pages 101-119
  7. James N. Huckins, Kees Booij, Jimmie D. Petty
    Pages 121-138
  8. James N. Huckins, Kees Booij, Jimmie D. Petty
    Pages 139-167
  9. James N. Huckins, Kees Booij, Jimmie D. Petty
    Pages 169-181
  10. James N. Huckins, Kees Booij, Jimmie D. Petty
    Pages 183-202
  11. James N. Huckins, Kees Booij, Jimmie D. Petty
    Pages 203-213
  12. Back Matter
    Pages 215-223

About this book

Introduction

Modern, industrialized societies depend on a wide range of chemical substances such as fuels, plastics, biocides, pharmaceuticals and detergents for maintaining the high quality lifestyle to which we aspire. The challenge is to ensure that while weenjoythebene?tsofthesesubstances,theirinevitablereleaseintoourbiosphere does not result in unwanted human and ecosystem exposures, and the risk of - verse effects. One response to this challenge has been the extensive effort to detect and analyze or monitor a multitude of chemicals in a variety of environmental media, especially toxic organic compounds in air, water, soils and biota. The c- ventionalmonitoringstrategyofsamplinglitersorkilogramsoftheenvironmental medium followed by analytical determination of the quantity of chemical in the sample extract has been the successful cornerstone of investigative environmental chemistry. No doubt, it will continue to be so. An extensive literature on these traditional techniques has evolved over the years. In parallel with conventional techniques, and I believe entirely complem- tary to them, a variety of in situ sensing systems have been developed which operate on the principle of the preferential partitioning of contaminants into a - vice, often at concentrations which are large multiples of environmental levels. Advocates point out that these partitioning devices have the advantage of integr- ing chemical concentrations over a prolonged period, thus “averaging” ambient levels. Their high partition coef?cients can yield signi?cant quantities of analyte and reduce problems arising from short-term pulses of concentration and from sample contamination.

Keywords

Analytical Chemistry Monitoring biomonitoring environment matrix

Authors and affiliations

  • James N. Huckins
    • 1
  • Kees Booij
    • 2
  • Jimmie D. Petty
    • 3
  1. 1.USGS Columbia Environmental Research CenterColumbia
  2. 2.Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea ResearchThe Netherlands
  3. 3.USGS Columbia Environmental Research CenterColumbia

Bibliographic information