Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages I-XXII
  2. Cindy L. Schwartz, Wendy L. Hobbie, Louis S. Constine, Kathleen S. Ruccione
    Pages 1-3
  3. Cindy L. Schwartz, Wendy L. Hobbie, Louis S. Constine
    Pages 5-16
  4. Cindy L. Schwartz, Wendy L. Hobbie, Louis S. Constine
    Pages 17-34
  5. Nina S. Kadan-Lottick, Joseph P. Neglia
    Pages 35-50
  6. Wing Leung, Susan R. Rose, Thomas E. Merchant
    Pages 51-80
  7. Michael Ober, Camille A. Servodidio, David Abramson
    Pages 81-94
  8. Arnold C. Paulino, Mary Koshy, Della Howell
    Pages 95-107
  9. Wendy Landier, Thomas E. Merchant
    Pages 109-123
  10. Tithi Biswas, Louis S. Constine, Cindy L. Schwartz
    Pages 125-132
  11. M. Jacob Adams, Sarah A. Duffy, Louis S. Constine, Steven E. Lipshultz
    Pages 133-159
  12. Andrea S. Hinkle, Cindy Proukou, Yuhchyau Chen
    Pages 161-180
  13. M. M. Hudson
    Pages 181-202
  14. Debra L. Friedman
    Pages 203-214
  15. Jill P. Ginsberg, Amit Maity
    Pages 215-230
  16. Lawrence Marks, Nicole Larrier
    Pages 231-242
  17. Robert B. Marcus Jr., Matthew R. DiCaprio, Dieter M. Lindskog, Brian E. McGrath, Kathy Gamble, Mark Scarborough
    Pages 243-269
  18. Nancy Bunin, Constance DiDomenico, Virginia Guzikowski
    Pages 271-282
  19. Barbara Anne Hieb, Susan K. Ogle, Anna T. Meadows
    Pages 283-294
  20. Mary T. Rourke, Anne E. Kazak
    Pages 295-304

About this book

Introduction

It was not long ago that clinicians would say,“study ed at the 1975 meeting revealed. Among them was the late complications of cancer treatments we give to one based on data collected by the Late Effects Study children? You must be joking! We can start worrying Group, an international consortium that consisted about that when we start curing them! Meanwhile, initially of ?ve, then ten, pediatric centers. This was cure must be our only aim. ”These practitioners were the ?rst large scale, cooperative unit of its kind, - only partially correct in what seemed to be a glaring ganized speci?cally for the purpose of studying the truth, for, in fact, increasing numbers of children late effects of cancer therapy (the study of delayed were beginning to survive their malignancy,and the complications had been included as part of the or- long-term consequences of therapy would soon be- inal design in the National Wilms Tumor Study come critical. launched in 1969) [1]. These historical notes demon- It is well to remember that the delayed conse- strate that the epidemiologic,statistical and reco- quences of a cancer treatment delivered to develop- keeping mechanisms necessary for studying lo- ing organisms were ?rst studied long ago. It has been term survivors effectively were in the process of be- 100 years since Perthes reported in 1903 that growth ing established decades before the meeting in 1975.

Keywords

Cancer Survivors Late Effects Long-term effects Post treatment effects Survivorship cancer treatment childhood

Editors and affiliations

  • Cindy L. Schwartz
    • 1
  • Wendy L. Hobbie
    • 2
  • Louis S. Constine
    • 3
  • Kathleen S. Ruccione
    • 4
  1. 1.The Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center at Johns HopkinsJohns Hopkins HospitalBaltimoreUSA
  2. 2.Division of OncologyChildrens Hospital of PhiladelphiaPhiladelphiaUSA
  3. 3.Radiation Oncology and PediatricsUniversity of Rochester Medical CenterRochesterUSA
  4. 4.Center for Cancer and Blood DiseasesChildrens Hospital Los AngelesLos AngelesUSA

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/b137709
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2005
  • Publisher Name Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg
  • eBook Packages Medicine
  • Print ISBN 978-3-540-40840-6
  • Online ISBN 978-3-540-26498-9
  • Series Print ISSN 1613-5318
  • About this book