Science and Application of Nanotubes

  • M. F. Thorpe
  • D. Tománek
  • R. J. Enbody

Part of the Fundamental Materials Research book series (FMRE)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xiii
  2. Morphology, Characterization, and Formation of Nanotubes

    1. A. Loiseau, N. Demoncy, O. Stéphan, C. Colliex, H. Pascard
      Pages 1-16
    2. Ph. Lambin, V. Meunier, A. Rubio
      Pages 17-33
    3. G. G. Tibbetts, J. C. Finegan, J. J. McHugh, J. -M. Ting, D. G. Glasgow, M. L. Lake
      Pages 35-51
    4. Jean-Christophe Charlier, Xavier Blase, Alessandro DeVita, Roberto Car
      Pages 53-65
    5. P. Simonis, A. Volodin, E. Seynaeve, Ph. Lambin, Ch. Van Haesendonck
      Pages 83-91
    6. T. Kostyrko, M. Bartkowiak, G.D. Mahan
      Pages 103-120
    7. Christophe Laurent, Alain Peigney, Emmanuel Flahaut, Revathi Bacsa, Abel Rousset
      Pages 151-168
    8. Thomas J. Manning, Andrea Noel, Mike Mitchell, Angela Miller, William Grow, Greg Gaddy et al.
      Pages 169-180
    9. Jun Li, Mawlin Foo, Ying Wang, Hou Tee Ng, Stephan Jaenicke, Guoqin Xu et al.
      Pages 181-193
  3. Mechanical and Chemical Properties of Nanotubes

    1. J. Bernholc, M. Buongiorno Nardelli, J.-L. Fattebert, D. Orlikowski, C. Roland, Q. Zhao
      Pages 195-203
    2. Christoph Nützenadel, Andreas Züttel, Christophe Emmenegger, Patrick Sudan, Louis Schlapbach
      Pages 205-213
    3. S. Weber, S. Talapatra, C. Journet, A. Migone
      Pages 215-221
  4. Electronic Properties of Nanotubes

    1. Phaedon Avouris, Richard Martel, Hiroya Ikeda, Mark Hersam, Herbert R. Shea, Alain Rochefort
      Pages 223-237

About this book

Introduction

This series of books, which is published at the rate of about one per year, addresses fundamental problems in materials science. The contents cover a broad range of topics from small clusters of atoms to engineering materials and involve chemistry, physics, materials science, and engineering, with length scales ranging from Ångstroms up to millimeters. The emphasis is on basic science rather than on applications. Each book focuses on a single area of current interest and brings together leading experts to give an up-to-date discussion of their work and the work of others. Each article contains enough references that the interested reader can access the relevant literature. Thanks are given to the Center for Fundamental Materials Research at Michigan State University for supporting this series. M. F. Thorpe, Series Editor E-mail: thorpe@pa. msu. edu East Lansing, Michigan V PREFACE It is hard to believe that not quite ten years ago, namely in 1991, nanotubes of carbon were discovered by Sumio Iijima in deposits on the electrodes of the same carbon arc apparatus that was used to produce fullerenes such as the “buckyball”. Nanotubes of carbon or other materials, consisting ofhollow cylinders that are only a few nanometers in diameter, yet up to millimeters long, are amazing structures that self-assemble under extreme conditions. Their quasi-one-dimensional character and virtual absence of atomic defects give rise to a plethora of unusual phenomena.

Keywords

Adsorption Raman spectroscopy Transport composite material electron microscopy microelectromechanical system (MEMS) microscopy spectroscopy theory

Editors and affiliations

  • M. F. Thorpe
    • 1
  • D. Tománek
    • 1
  • R. J. Enbody
    • 1
  1. 1.Michigan State UniversityEast Lansing

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/b119176
  • Copyright Information Kluwer Academic Publishers 2002
  • Publisher Name Springer, Boston, MA
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-0-306-46372-3
  • Online ISBN 978-0-306-47098-1
  • Series Print ISSN 1567-830X
  • About this book