Ryanodine Receptors

Structure, function and dysfunction in clinical disease

  • Xander H. T. Wehrens
  • Andrew R. Marks

Part of the Developments in Cardiovascular Medicine book series (DICM, volume 254)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xxi
  2. Alexander Kushnir, A. K. M. M. Mollah, Xander H. T. Wehrens
    Pages 1-8
  3. Guo Guang Du, David H. MacLennan
    Pages 9-23
  4. Zheng Liu, Terence Wagenknecht
    Pages 25-34
  5. Clara Franzini-Armstrong
    Pages 35-41
  6. Alan J. Williams, S. R. Wayne Chen, William Welch
    Pages 43-52
  7. Noriaki Ikemoto
    Pages 53-65
  8. Sandor Györke, Dmitry Terentyev, Serge Viatchenko-Karpinski
    Pages 67-76
  9. Josefina Ramos-Franco, Michael Fill
    Pages 77-86
  10. W. J. Lederer, Eric A. Sobie, Silvia Guatimosim, Long-Sheng Song
    Pages 87-97
  11. Donald M. Bers, Kenneth S. Ginsburg
    Pages 99-109
  12. Mary E. Díaz, Stephen C. O’Neill, Andrew W. Trafford, David A. Eisner
    Pages 111-119
  13. Steven O. Marx
    Pages 121-130
  14. Yasuo Ogawa, Takashi Murayama, Nagomi Kurebayashi
    Pages 131-140
  15. Hiroshi Takeshima
    Pages 141-150
  16. Xander H. T. Wehrens, Stephan E. Lehnart, Andrew R. Marks
    Pages 151-161
  17. Paula Aracena, Cecilia Hidalgo, Susan L. Hamilton
    Pages 163-168
  18. Edmond D. Buck, Barbara E. Ehrlich
    Pages 169-178
  19. Henry R. Besch Jr., Chun Hong Shao, Keshore R. Bidasee
    Pages 179-189
  20. Georgina B. Gurrola, Xinsheng Zhu, Héctor H. Valdivia
    Pages 191-200

About this book

Introduction

In recent years, the ryanodine receptor has emerged as a new and very promising target for the treatment of several cardiovascular disorders, including cardiac arrhythmias and heart failure. This volume is the most current publication devoted to the major intracellular calcium-release channel, the ryanodine receptor.

"In this series of brief but informative chapters, the contributions progress from the basic gene family and primary structure, through its 3D structure so far, to its regulation and physiology."

David E. Clapham, MD, PhD
Professor of Neurobiology and Pediatrics
Harvard Medical School

Dr. Xander H.T. Wehrens received his M.D. and Ph.D. degrees from Maastricht University in the Netherlands. His research has mainly concentrated on molecular mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias, in particular in the setting of inherited arrhythmogenic syndromes and congestive heart failure. This work has led to the development of novel anti-arrhythmic therapies. He is currently a research scientist in the Department of Physiology and Cellular Biophysics at the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University.

Dr. Andrew R. Marks is the Chair and Professor of the Department of Physiology and Cellular Biophysics at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. Dr. Marks' research has focused on understanding how macromolecular signaling complexes regulate ion channel function in muscle and non-muscle systems, and on the regulation of vascular smooth muscle proliferation and migration. His work has contributed new understandings of fundamental mechanisms that regulate muscle contraction that have lead to the discovery of molecular defects that contribute to heart failure and fatal cardiac arrhythmias.

Keywords

cardiovascular pathophysiology physiology skeletal muscle smooth muscle

Editors and affiliations

  • Xander H. T. Wehrens
    • 1
  • Andrew R. Marks
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of Physiology and Cellular Biophysics, Center for Molecular CardiologyCollege of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia UniversityNew YorkUSA

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/b100805
  • Copyright Information Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2005
  • Publisher Name Springer, Boston, MA
  • eBook Packages Medicine
  • Print ISBN 978-0-387-23187-7
  • Online ISBN 978-0-387-23188-4
  • Series Print ISSN 0166-9842
  • About this book