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Discerning the Powers in Post-Colonial Africa and Asia

A Treatise on Christian Statecraft

  • Pak Nung Wong

About this book

Introduction

Qualifying post-Westphalian sovereign statehood as a ‘power’ as argued for in Hendrik Berkhoff’s political theology, this book addresses the decades-long theological-spiritual debate between Christian realism and Christian pacifism in U.S. foreign policy and global Christian circles. It approaches the debate by delving into the pacifist Anabaptist political theology and delineates empirically how sovereign statehood in post-colonial Africa and Asia has fallen into the hands of the devil Satan, as a ‘fallen power’ in the Foucaultian terms of power structures, techniques and episteme. While the book offers intervention schemes and options, it holds that Christian statecraft remains the source of hope to effectively address a number of serious global issues. By extension, the book is thus an invitation to ignite debates on the suitability of Christian statecraft and the nexus between spirituality and world politics, making it especially interesting for scholars and students in the fields of International Politics, Politics of Asian and African States, Post-colonial Studies and Political Theology.  

Keywords

Academic Spirituality and Buddhist-Christian Dialogue Censure, Exception and Criminal Justice in Socialist China Christian Pacifism Christian Social Theory and Post-Colonial States Christian Social Theory in Africa Christian Social Theory in Asia Christian Statecraft and the Cambodian Genocide Christian Statecraft and the Rwandan Genocide Christian pacifist political theology Christian realism Christian statecraft and Foucaultian perspectives Christian statecraft and the Philippine ‘Strongman’ Christian statecraft in post-colonial Africa Christian statecraft in post-colonial Asia Hendrik Berkhoff’s political theology Pacifist Anabaptist political theology Post-Colonial Christian Statecraft U.S. foreign policy

Authors and affiliations

  • Pak Nung Wong
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Politics, Languages and International Studies, University of BathBathUnited Kingdom

Bibliographic information