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Zero Hours and On-call Work in Anglo-Saxon Countries

  • Michelle O’Sullivan
  • Jonathan Lavelle
  • Juliet McMahon
  • Lorraine Ryan
  • Caroline Murphy
  • Thomas Turner
  • Patrick Gunnigle

Part of the Work, Organization, and Employment book series (WOAE)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-ix
  2. Caroline Murphy, Jonathan Lavelle, Thomas Turner, Lorraine Ryan, Juliet McMahon, Michelle O’Sullivan et al.
    Pages 21-40
  3. Abi Adams, Zoe Adams, Jeremias Prassl
    Pages 41-65
  4. Iain Campbell, Fiona Macdonald, Sara Charlesworth
    Pages 67-90
  5. Gordon B. Cooke, Firat K. Sayin, James Chowhan, Sara L. Mann, Isik U. Zeytinoglu
    Pages 137-157
  6. Debra Howcroft, Tony Dundon, Cristina Inversi
    Pages 215-232

About this book

Introduction

This book focuses on zero hours and on-call work as an extreme form of casual and precarious employment. It includes country studies of the USA, Canada, Australia, the UK, New Zealand and Ireland, where there has been increasing concern about the prevalence of such work, and working time uncertainty, as well as varying levels of public policy debate on regulation. The book incorporates a comparative review of zero hours work based on the findings of the country studies. This pays particular attention to state regulatory responses to zero hours work, and incorporates the sociological concepts of accumulation and legitimation functions of the state.

Exploring the regulation of zero hours work beyond individual countries, the book includes an analysis of external regulation of zero hours work at the supranational level, namely the European Union and ILO.

Further, it assesses the implications of zero hours for workers in new sectors of economic activity, particularly the impact of the platform or ‘gig’ economy on the fundamental nature of the employment relationship. It also considers the societal implications of zero hours work and the ethical responsibilities of employers and governments towards workers as citizens. 

Keywords

Zero Hours Work On-Call Work Hourly Paid Work Casual Work Precarious Work Gig Economy Employment Law Trade Union Employment Rights Employment Regimes Liberal Market Economy Corporate Social Responsibility International Labour Organisation International Framework Agreement Labour Market Precariat

Editors and affiliations

  • Michelle O’Sullivan
    • 1
  • Jonathan Lavelle
    • 2
  • Juliet McMahon
    • 3
  • Lorraine Ryan
    • 4
  • Caroline Murphy
    • 5
  • Thomas Turner
    • 6
  • Patrick Gunnigle
    • 7
  1. 1.Department of Work and Employment Studies, Kemmy Business SchoolUniversity of LimerickLimerickIreland
  2. 2.Department of Work and Employment Studies, Kemmy Business SchoolUniversity of LimerickLimerickIreland
  3. 3.Department of Work and Employment Studies, Kemmy Business SchoolUniversity of LimerickLimerickIreland
  4. 4.Department of Work and Employment Studies, Kemmy Business SchoolUniversity of LimerickLimerickIreland
  5. 5.Department of Work and Employment Studies, Kemmy Business SchoolUniversity of LimerickLimerickIreland
  6. 6.Department of Work and Employment Studies, Kemmy Business SchoolUniversity of LimerickLimerickIreland
  7. 7.Department of Work and Employment Studies, Kemmy Business SchoolUniversity of LimerickLimerickIreland

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-13-6613-0
  • Copyright Information Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019
  • Publisher Name Springer, Singapore
  • eBook Packages Business and Management
  • Print ISBN 978-981-13-6612-3
  • Online ISBN 978-981-13-6613-0
  • Series Print ISSN 2520-8837
  • Series Online ISSN 2520-8845
  • Buy this book on publisher's site