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From Small Places

Toward the Realization of Literacy as a Human Right

  • Authors
  • Jo-Anne Wilson-Keenan

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xxviii
  2. History and Theory of Literacy as a Human Right

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 1-1
    2. Jo-Anne Wilson-Keenan
      Pages 3-16
    3. Jo-Anne Wilson-Keenan
      Pages 17-26
    4. Jo-Anne Wilson-Keenan
      Pages 27-40
  3. Things so Destructive: Barriers to Literacy as a Human Right

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 41-41
    2. Jo-Anne Wilson-Keenan
      Pages 43-56
    3. Jo-Anne Wilson-Keenan
      Pages 57-66
  4. Research that Builds on Strengths and Leads to the Realization of Literacy as a Human Right

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 67-67
    2. Jo-Anne Wilson-Keenan
      Pages 69-76
    3. Jo-Anne Wilson-Keenan
      Pages 77-84
    4. Jo-Anne Wilson-Keenan
      Pages 85-100
    5. Jo-Anne Wilson-Keenan
      Pages 101-118
    6. Jo-Anne Wilson-Keenan
      Pages 119-135
  5. Things that are Clearly Beneficial: Initiatives and Practices that Support Literacy as a Human Right

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 137-137
    2. Jo-Anne Wilson-Keenan
      Pages 139-149
    3. Jo-Anne Wilson-Keenan
      Pages 151-162
    4. Jo-Anne Wilson-Keenan
      Pages 163-181
    5. Jo-Anne Wilson-Keenan
      Pages 183-187
    6. Jo-Anne Wilson-Keenan
      Pages 189-204
  6. Back Matter
    Pages 189-229

About this book

Introduction

From Small Places: Toward the Realization of Literacy as a Human Right brings together history, theory, research, and practices that can lead to the realization of this right, both in itself, and as a means of achieving other rights.
The premise of this book is that this right begins early in life within small places across the world. This idea originates from the words of Eleanor Roosevelt, Chair of the Commission that drafted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR):
Where, after all, do universal human rights begin? In small places, close to home—so close and so small that they cannot be seen on any map of the world… Unless these rights have meaning there, they have little meaning anywhere.
Herein, literacy is viewed as a life-long social process. Literacy includes reading, writing, and new literacies that are evolving along with new technologies.
The book includes an examination of the evolution of literacy as a human right from 1948, the time of the writing of the UDHR, to the present. Barriers to the realization of literacy as a
human right, including the pedagogy of poverty and pathologizing the language of poor children, are explored. The book also describes theory, research and practices that can serve to dismantle these barriers. It includes research about brain development, language and literacy development from birth to the age of six, and examples of practices and community initiatives that honor, support, and build upon children’s language and literacy.

Keywords

Literacy human rights brain development oral and written language developmen new literacies

Bibliographic information