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Combat Motivation

The Behavior of Soldiers in Battle

  • Authors
  • Anthony¬†Kellett
Book

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xxi
  2. Introduction

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 1-1
    2. Anthony Kellett
      Pages 3-17
    3. Anthony Kellett
      Pages 19-38
  3. The Garrison Background

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 39-39
    2. Anthony Kellett
      Pages 41-58
    3. Anthony Kellett
      Pages 59-65
    4. Anthony Kellett
      Pages 67-78
    5. Anthony Kellett
      Pages 79-88
    6. Anthony Kellett
      Pages 89-93
  4. Organizational Factors of the Combat Environment

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 95-95
    2. Anthony Kellett
      Pages 97-117
    3. Anthony Kellett
      Pages 119-132
    4. Anthony Kellett
      Pages 133-148
    5. Anthony Kellett
      Pages 149-163
  5. Individual Factors of the Combat Environment

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 165-165
    2. Anthony Kellett
      Pages 167-199
    3. Anthony Kellett
      Pages 201-213
  6. Combat

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 215-215
    2. Anthony Kellett
      Pages 217-229
    3. Anthony Kellett
      Pages 231-269
    4. Anthony Kellett
      Pages 271-290
    5. Anthony Kellett
      Pages 291-315
  7. Summary and Conclusions

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 317-317
    2. Anthony Kellett
      Pages 319-332
    3. Anthony Kellett
      Pages 333-336
  8. Back Matter
    Pages 337-362

About this book

Introduction

"What men will fight for seems to be worth looking into," H. L. Mencken noted shortly after the close of the First World War. Prior to that war, although many military commanders and theorists had throughout history shown an aptitude for devising maxims concerning esprit de corps, fighting spirit, morale, and the like, military organizations had rarely sought either to understand or to promote combat motivation. For example, an officer who graduated from the Royal Military College (Sandhurst) at the end of the nineteenth century later commented that the art of leadership was utterly neglected (Charlton 1931, p. 48), while General Wavell recalled that during his course at the British Staff College at Camberley (1909-1 0) insufficient stress was laid "on the factor of morale, or how to induce it and maintain it'' (quoted in Connell1964, p. 63). The First World War forced commanders and staffs to take account of psychological factors and to anticipate wideJy varied responses to the combat environment because, unlike most previous wars, it was not fought by relatively small and homogeneous armies of regulars and trained reservists. The mobilization by the belligerents of about 65 million men (many of whom were enrolled under duress), the evidence of fairly widespread psychiatric breakdown, and the postwar disillusion (- xiii xiv PREFACE emplified in books like C. E. Montague's Disenchantment, published in 1922) all tended to dispel assumptions and to provoke questions about mo­ tivation and morale.

Keywords

environment leadership organization organizations science and technology stress value-at-risk

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-015-3965-4
  • Copyright Information Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 1982
  • Publisher Name Springer, Dordrecht
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-0-89838-106-1
  • Online ISBN 978-94-015-3965-4
  • Buy this book on publisher's site