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Identification of Vegetable Fibres

  • Dorothy Catling
  • John Grayson

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-vi
  2. Dorothy Catling, John Grayson
    Pages 1-5
  3. Dorothy Catling, John Grayson
    Pages 6-11
  4. Dorothy Catling, John Grayson
    Pages 12-17
  5. Dorothy Catling, John Grayson
    Pages 18-23
  6. Dorothy Catling, John Grayson
    Pages 24-29
  7. Dorothy Catling, John Grayson
    Pages 30-35
  8. Dorothy Catling, John Grayson
    Pages 36-42
  9. Dorothy Catling, John Grayson
    Pages 43-45
  10. Dorothy Catling, John Grayson
    Pages 46-50
  11. Dorothy Catling, John Grayson
    Pages 51-57
  12. Dorothy Catling, John Grayson
    Pages 58-64
  13. Dorothy Catling, John Grayson
    Pages 65-70
  14. Back Matter
    Pages 71-106

About this book

Introduction

It is often possible to identify fragments of plants by studying their microscopical characteristics. The recognition of a single feature very rarely establishes the plant's identity; more often, it is necessary to recognize a unique combination of characteris­ tics. For plant identification, the most valuable characteristics are those least likely to be affected by changes in environment; if the feature is uncommon as well as stable, it is even more useful. Good descriptions of the anatomy of plants are invaluable. For example, The Identifi­ cation of Hardwoods (Brazier and Franklin, 1961), together with its punched card key, is an excellent book which is useful in practice. Characters describing the sc1erenchyma account for only three places in this key. Using only these characters, it would be impossible to identify a timber. Is it possible then, to identify a species given only sc1erenchyma in the form of a commercial fibre? If it is possible, it is not easy. Although, for many purposes, plant fibres are being replaced by man-made fibres, vegetable fibres are still used, particularly in sacking and cordage and in some indus­ trial materials. Articles which must be examined in a forensic science laboratory are not always of recent manufacture and archaeologists and historians are interested in older materials. Therefore, it is still necessary for many workers to identify the plant species from which fibres have been extracted.

Keywords

anatomy environment flax plant plants science

Authors and affiliations

  • Dorothy Catling
    • 1
  • John Grayson
    • 2
  1. 1.Forensic Science LaboratoryThe Metropolitan PoliceUK
  2. 2.Thames PolytechnicUK

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-011-8070-2
  • Copyright Information Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 1982
  • Publisher Name Springer, Dordrecht
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-94-011-8072-6
  • Online ISBN 978-94-011-8070-2
  • Buy this book on publisher's site