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The Business of Shipping

  • Authors
  • Lane C. Kendall

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-x
  2. Lane C. Kendall
    Pages 3-4
  3. Lane C. Kendall
    Pages 5-11
  4. Lane C. Kendall
    Pages 12-37
  5. Lane C. Kendall
    Pages 38-61
  6. Lane C. Kendall
    Pages 62-79
  7. Lane C. Kendall
    Pages 80-103
  8. Lane C. Kendall
    Pages 104-132
  9. Lane C. Kendall
    Pages 133-151
  10. Lane C. Kendall
    Pages 152-162
  11. Lane C. Kendall
    Pages 163-191
  12. Lane C. Kendall
    Pages 192-216
  13. Lane C. Kendall
    Pages 217-252
  14. Lane C. Kendall
    Pages 253-268
  15. Lane C. Kendall
    Pages 269-293
  16. Lane C. Kendall
    Pages 294-300
  17. Lane C. Kendall
    Pages 301-322
  18. Lane C. Kendall
    Pages 323-335
  19. Lane C. Kendall
    Pages 336-351
  20. Lane C. Kendall
    Pages 352-374
  21. Lane C. Kendall
    Pages 376-409
  22. Lane C. Kendall
    Pages 410-427
  23. Lane C. Kendall
    Pages 428-457
  24. Lane C. Kendall
    Pages 458-481
  25. Lane C. Kendall
    Pages 482-488
  26. Back Matter
    Pages 409-503

About this book

Introduction

T HIS VOL U M E has been written to describe the business side of a commercial enterprise whose field is the entire civilized world. Historically, the theory and knowledge of shipping management, as distinguished from the practical skills of seaman­ ship, have been transmitted from one generation to the next by word of mouth. Little has been put on paper, primarily because the finest exponents of the art of steamship management have been too busy with their day-to-day concerns to do so. The "working level" personnel often are superbly competent, but rarely qualify as liter­ ary craftsmen. It has been my aim, in preparing this analysis of the principles of the "business" of commercial shipping, to describe that which trans­ pires in the various divisions of a shipowning and operating organi­ zation. Insofar as possible, the procedures followed in the offices have been described and explained, as well as the underlying prin­ ciples of management by which their decisions are reached. In the process of learning the principles and practices that are set forth in these pages, I have spent ajoy-filled lifetime in associa­ tion with ships. It has been my good fortune to work in large and small American steamship offices, to operate a major cargo termi­ nal, to participate in establishing and putting into effect the policies of a world-girdling American steamship organization, and to teach young men these principles learned from experience as well as from precept.

Keywords

Tank container scheduling shipping tramp shipping

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-009-4117-5
  • Copyright Information Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 1986
  • Publisher Name Springer, Dordrecht
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-94-010-8326-3
  • Online ISBN 978-94-009-4117-5
  • Buy this book on publisher's site