Landscape and Vegetation Ecology of the Kakadu Region, Northern Australia

  • C. Max Finlayson
  • Isabell Von Oertzen

Part of the Geobotany book series (GEOB, volume 23)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-viii
  2. C. Max Finlayson, Isabell Von Oertzen
    Pages 1-15
  3. Chris V. McQuade, Jim T. Arthur, Ian J. Butterworth
    Pages 17-35
  4. T. Jon East
    Pages 37-55
  5. Bruce A. Wilson, Jeremy Russell-Smith, Richard Williams
    Pages 57-79
  6. C. Max Finlayson, Colin D. Woodroffe
    Pages 81-112
  7. Ian D. Cowie
    Pages 113-135
  8. Alan N. Andersen, Richard W. Braithwaite
    Pages 137-154
  9. Andrew J. Skeat, T. Jon East, Laurie K. Corbett
    Pages 155-177
  10. Alan N. Andersen
    Pages 179-195
  11. Back Matter
    Pages 197-202

About this book

Introduction

The Kakadu reg10n of northern Australia is swarming over the landscape with their meters steeped in cultural history and natural grandeur. and notebooks and a vast store of information Over the past few decades the rich cultural and was gathered. This book is a summary of the natural heritage of this fascinating region has immense amount of information collected on the become increasingly known to more and more geobotanic features of the region. The cultural people. At the same time as the natural heritage of heritage of the traditional Aboriginal inhabitants the region was being recognised by conser­ of the region and the diverse and populous fauna vationists and tourists alike the mineral wealth were also investigated. but both these subjects was being recognised by mining enterprises. warrant their own separate volumes and are not Almost inevitably, the mix of conservation and treated here. Throughout this period of intense scientific mining interests led to conflict that is still not completely resolved. However, much has hap­ interest the very nature of the region has changed. pened over the years and we now have a major Besides changes in human habitation the physical and biological environment has come under national park that is largely leased from the Aboriginal traditional owners under a manage­ challenge and even threat. We now have more weed species. We no longer have the large ment agreement.

Keywords

ecology evolution hydrology vegetation wetland

Editors and affiliations

  • C. Max Finlayson
    • 1
  • Isabell Von Oertzen
    • 1
  1. 1.Environmental Research Institute of the Supervising ScientistJabiruAustralia

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-009-0133-9
  • Copyright Information Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 1996
  • Publisher Name Springer, Dordrecht
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-94-010-6547-4
  • Online ISBN 978-94-009-0133-9
  • About this book