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Programming in Prolog

  • William F. Clocksin
  • Christopher S. Mellish
Book

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages I-XII
  2. William F. Clocksin, Christopher S. Mellish
    Pages 1-21
  3. William F. Clocksin, Christopher S. Mellish
    Pages 22-38
  4. William F. Clocksin, Christopher S. Mellish
    Pages 39-57
  5. William F. Clocksin, Christopher S. Mellish
    Pages 58-78
  6. William F. Clocksin, Christopher S. Mellish
    Pages 79-93
  7. William F. Clocksin, Christopher S. Mellish
    Pages 94-129
  8. William F. Clocksin, Christopher S. Mellish
    Pages 130-163
  9. William F. Clocksin, Christopher S. Mellish
    Pages 164-186
  10. William F. Clocksin, Christopher S. Mellish
    Pages 187-206
  11. William F. Clocksin, Christopher S. Mellish
    Pages 207-227
  12. William F. Clocksin, Christopher S. Mellish
    Pages 228-234
  13. Back Matter
    Pages 235-281

About this book

Introduction

The computer programming language Prolog is quickly gaining popularity throughout the world. Since Its beginnings around 1970. Prolog has been chosen by many programmers for applications of symbolic computation. including: D relational databases D mathematical logic D abstract problem solving D understanding natural language D architectural design D symbolic equation solving D biochemical structure analysis D many areas of artificial Intelligence Until now. there has been no textbook with the aim of teaching Prolog as a practical programming language. It Is perhaps a tribute to Prolog that so many people have been motivated to learn It by referring to the necessarily concise reference manuals. a few published papers. and by the orally transmitted 'folklore' of the modern computing community. However. as Prolog is beginning to be Introduced to large numbers of undergraduate and postgraduate students. many of our colleagues have expressed a great need for a tutorial guide to learning Prolog. We hope this little book will go some way towards meeting this need. Many newcomers to Prolog find that the task of writing a Prolog program Is not like specifying an algorithm in the same way as In a conventional programming language. Instead. the Prolog programmer asks more what formal relationships and objects occur In his problem.

Keywords

Natural Programmiersprache Prolog algorithm algorithms artificial intelligence intelligence künstliche Intelligenz learning logic logisches Programmieren natural language problem solving programming programming language

Authors and affiliations

  • William F. Clocksin
    • 1
  • Christopher S. Mellish
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Engineering ScienceUniversity of OxfordOxfordEngland
  2. 2.Department of Artificial IntelligenceUniversity of EdinburghEdinburghScotland

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-96661-3
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1981
  • Publisher Name Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-3-540-11046-0
  • Online ISBN 978-3-642-96661-3
  • Buy this book on publisher's site