EEG Atlas for Anesthesiologists

  • Ina Pichlmayr
  • Peter Lehmkuhl
  • Ulrich Lips

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages I-VII
  2. Introduction

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 1-1
    2. Ina Pichlmayr, Peter Lehmkuhl, Ulrich Lips
      Pages 3-3
    3. Ina Pichlmayr, Peter Lehmkuhl, Ulrich Lips
      Pages 8-9
    4. Ina Pichlmayr, Peter Lehmkuhl, Ulrich Lips
      Pages 10-18
  3. EEG Under Anesthetic Medication and Perioperative Influence

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 19-19
    2. Ina Pichlmayr, Peter Lehmkuhl, Ulrich Lips
      Pages 21-61
    3. Ina Pichlmayr, Peter Lehmkuhl, Ulrich Lips
      Pages 62-75
    4. Ina Pichlmayr, Peter Lehmkuhl, Ulrich Lips
      Pages 76-101
    5. Ina Pichlmayr, Peter Lehmkuhl, Ulrich Lips
      Pages 103-197
    6. Ina Pichlmayr, Peter Lehmkuhl, Ulrich Lips
      Pages 198-203
    7. Ina Pichlmayr, Peter Lehmkuhl, Ulrich Lips
      Pages 204-229
    8. Ina Pichlmayr, Peter Lehmkuhl, Ulrich Lips
      Pages 230-235
    9. Ina Pichlmayr, Peter Lehmkuhl, Ulrich Lips
      Pages 236-255
    10. Ina Pichlmayr, Peter Lehmkuhl, Ulrich Lips
      Pages 256-269
    11. Ina Pichlmayr, Peter Lehmkuhl, Ulrich Lips
      Pages 270-281
  4. EEG as a Method of Monitoring Anesthesia

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 283-283
    2. Ina Pichlmayr, Peter Lehmkuhl, Ulrich Lips
      Pages 284-367
    3. Ina Pichlmayr, Peter Lehmkuhl, Ulrich Lips
      Pages 369-379

About this book

Introduction

This atlas offers a collection of EEG spectral analyses and their corresponding conventional recordings under anes­ thesio10gical procedures. The EEGs presented here were re­ corded on general surgical and gynecological patients during the last few years. Premedication, induction and maintenance of anesthesia, recovery the immediate postoperative period, and intensive care are covered. Techniques for operating the necessary equipment and artefacts relevant to the routine clinical use of EEG are briefly outlined. Typical examples of characteristic EEGs are presented at the beginning of each chapter, followed by illustrations of deviations from the norm showing the great variety of anesthesiologically induced changes of cerebral function. The description of each EEG course is assessed in relation to clinical parameters. Sometimes no satisfactory interpreta­ tion can be made, because many physiological and patho­ physiological causes of alterations in cerebral function are unknown. Time and again it proves impossible to estimate wether deviations from the norm have their origin in cerebral changes or are secondary to extracerebra1 disturbances. The atlas comprises a complete survey in itself, but it can also be seen as a supplement to the book The Electroenceph­ alogram in Anesthesia by I. Pich1mayr, U. Lips, and H. Kunkel (Springer, 1983), in which detailed lists of references are quoted that are omitted here.

Keywords

anesthesia anesthesiology electroencephalography (EEG) intensive care unit muscle

Authors and affiliations

  • Ina Pichlmayr
    • 1
  • Peter Lehmkuhl
    • 1
  • Ulrich Lips
    • 1
  1. 1.Zentrum für Anästhesiologie, Abteilung IV, Krankenhaus OststadtMedizinischen Hochschule HannoverHannover 51Germany

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-83161-4
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1987
  • Publisher Name Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-3-642-83163-8
  • Online ISBN 978-3-642-83161-4
  • About this book