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Tuberculosis

  • Thomas M. Shinnick

Part of the Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology book series (CT MICROBIOLOGY, volume 215)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages I-XI
  2. R. E. Lee, P. J. Brennan, G. S. Besra
    Pages 1-27
  3. B. Heym, W. Philipp, S. T. Cole
    Pages 49-69
  4. F. D. Quinn, G. W. Newman, C. H. King
    Pages 131-156
  5. D. N. McMurray, F. M. Collins, A. M. Dannenberg Jr., D. W. Smith
    Pages 157-179
  6. I. M. Orme
    Pages 181-196
  7. P. F. Barnes, R. L. Modlin
    Pages 197-219
  8. Z. Toossi, J. J. Ellner
    Pages 221-238
  9. G. A. W. Rook, J. L. Stanford
    Pages 239-262
  10. Back Matter
    Pages 303-311

About this book

Introduction

Tuberculosis has plagued mankind since prehistoric times and is still an important source of morbidity and mortality, with particularly devastating effects in developing and tropical countries. Tuberculosis results from an infection with Myeo­ baeterium tubereu/osis, and the World Health Organization estimates that perhaps as much as one-third of the world's population or approximately 1. 9 billion persons are or have been infected with M. tubereu/osis. Each year, there are 8-10 million new cases of tuberculosis and about 3 million deaths due to it. Indeed, tuberculosis is the leading cause of death in adults due to a single infectious agent and accounts for ap­ proximately 26% of all preventable adult deaths in the world. In addition, tuberculosis is an enormous social and economic problem because approximately 95% of new cases occur in developing countries and because about 80% of tuberculosis cases affect persons of child-bearing age and du ring their most economically productive years (ages 15-59). Tuberculosis has also re-emerged as an important public health problem in many developed countries. For example, between 1985 and 1992, the number of tuberculosis cases reported to the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention increased by more than 20%. Similarly, Austria experienced a 5% increase in tuberculosis cases from 1987 to 1991, Ireland a 9% increase from 1988 to 1991, Denmark a 20% increase from 1987 to 1992, and Italy a 27% increase from 1988 to 1992.

Keywords

bacteria drug resistance genetics immune response immune system immunology infection macrophages molecular biology molecular genetics parasite pathogenesis pathology tuberculosis vaccination

Editors and affiliations

  • Thomas M. Shinnick
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Health and Human ServicesImmunology and Molecular Pathogenesis Section, Division of AIDS, STD and TB Laboratory Research, Centers for Disease Control and PreventionAtlantaUSA

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-80166-2
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1996
  • Publisher Name Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-3-642-80168-6
  • Online ISBN 978-3-642-80166-2
  • Series Print ISSN 0070-217X
  • Buy this book on publisher's site