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Transposable Elements

  • Heinz Saedler
  • Alfons Gierl

Part of the Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology book series (CT MICROBIOLOGY, volume 204)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages I-IX
  2. E. Ohtsubo, Y. Sekine
    Pages 1-26
  3. N. L. Craig
    Pages 27-48
  4. N. Kleckner, R. M. Chalmers, D. Kwon, J. Sakai, S. Bolland
    Pages 49-82
  5. B. D. Lavoie, G. Chaconas
    Pages 83-102
  6. W. R. Engels
    Pages 103-123
  7. R. H. A. Plasterk
    Pages 125-143
  8. J. L. Bennetzen
    Pages 195-229
  9. Back Matter
    Pages 231-237

About this book

Introduction

Most genes are lined up on chromosomes like pearls on a string. However, a certain class of genes differ by being highly mobile; and the mecha­ they are termed transposons. Their properties of transposition will be described in this book. nism is the rule, irregularities like a spot on a Where uniformity plain-coloured surface strike the eye. Thus the phenomenon of has long been a source of fascina­ variegation among organisms In plants, variegation is most easily recognised as irregulari­ tion. in pigment patterns on leaves, flowers and seeds, but other ties as leaf or flower form might also show characteristics such In 1588, such a variegation pattern was described in variegation. kernels of Zea mays by Jacob Theodor of Bergzabern, a village is so detailed that if south of Strasbourg. The report by Theodor one counts the different kernel phenotypes described it be­ is looking at a Mendelian segrega­ comes clear that the author had tion. It goes without saying that Latin-American Indians already bred such variegated material much earlier, but no descriptions have yet been uncovered. Meanwhile, genetically heritable variegation patterns have been described at many different loci in more than 34 different plant species.

Keywords

DNA Drosophila Genom Genome rearrangements Gentechnologie Transposable elements Vivo bacteria chromosome evolution genome plants regulation transposition

Editors and affiliations

  • Heinz Saedler
    • 1
  • Alfons Gierl
    • 2
  1. 1.Max-Planck-Institut für ZüchtungsforschungKölnGermany
  2. 2.Lehrstuhl und Institut für GenetikTechnische Universität MünchenGarchingGermany

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-79795-8
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1996
  • Publisher Name Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-3-642-79797-2
  • Online ISBN 978-3-642-79795-8
  • Series Print ISSN 0070-217X
  • Buy this book on publisher's site