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Plasticity in the Somatosensory System of Developing and Mature Mammals — The Effects of Injury to the Central and Peripheral Nervous System

  • Peter J. Snow
  • Peter Wilson

Part of the Progress in Sensory Physiology book series (PHYSIOLOGY, volume 11)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages I-XVI
  2. Peter J. Snow, Peter Wilson
    Pages 1-5
  3. Peter J. Snow, Peter Wilson
    Pages 6-57
  4. Peter J. Snow, Peter Wilson
    Pages 58-116
  5. Peter J. Snow, Peter Wilson
    Pages 225-285
  6. Peter J. Snow, Peter Wilson
    Pages 286-311
  7. Peter J. Snow, Peter Wilson
    Pages 312-393
  8. Peter J. Snow, Peter Wilson
    Pages 394-425
  9. Back Matter
    Pages 426-482

About these proceedings

Introduction

Rarely have the many mechanisms that might underlie neural plasticity been examined as explicitly as they are in this broad, lavishly illustrated treatment of plasticity in the somatosensory system. The reader is provided with state-of-the-art knowledge of connections at all levels of the somatosensory system. The authors examine the propensity for changes of connectivity in both the mature and developing mammal and make clear proposals regarding the mechanisms underlying these changes. Their functional significance to relevant psychophysical and neurological observations is also discussed.

Keywords

Brain Damage Nerve Lesion Nervenverletzung Nervous System Neurologie Neurology Plastizität des ZNS Schmerz Schädelhirntrauma cortex neurons

Authors and affiliations

  • Peter J. Snow
    • 1
  • Peter Wilson
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Anatomy, Mammalian Neurobiology LaboratoriesUniversity of QueenslandSt. LuciaAustralia

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-75701-3
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1991
  • Publisher Name Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-3-642-75703-7
  • Online ISBN 978-3-642-75701-3
  • Series Print ISSN 0721-9156
  • Buy this book on publisher's site