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Ultrasound in Synthesis

  • Steven V. Ley
  • Caroline M. R. Low

Part of the Reactivity and Structure Concepts in Organic Chemistry book series (REACTIVITY, volume 27)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages I-X
  2. Steven V. Ley, Caroline M. R. Low
    Pages 1-1
  3. Steven V. Ley, Caroline M. R. Low
    Pages 2-28
  4. Steven V. Ley, Caroline M. R. Low
    Pages 29-32
  5. Steven V. Ley, Caroline M. R. Low
    Pages 33-38
  6. Steven V. Ley, Caroline M. R. Low
    Pages 39-39
  7. Steven V. Ley, Caroline M. R. Low
    Pages 40-50
  8. Steven V. Ley, Caroline M. R. Low
    Pages 51-58
  9. Steven V. Ley, Caroline M. R. Low
    Pages 59-74
  10. Steven V. Ley, Caroline M. R. Low
    Pages 75-75
  11. Steven V. Ley, Caroline M. R. Low
    Pages 76-77
  12. Steven V. Ley, Caroline M. R. Low
    Pages 78-96
  13. Steven V. Ley, Caroline M. R. Low
    Pages 97-102
  14. Steven V. Ley, Caroline M. R. Low
    Pages 103-104
  15. Steven V. Ley, Caroline M. R. Low
    Pages 105-119
  16. Steven V. Ley, Caroline M. R. Low
    Pages 120-120
  17. Steven V. Ley, Caroline M. R. Low
    Pages 121-128
  18. Back Matter
    Pages 129-133

About this book

Introduction

The effects of heat and light on chemical reactions have long been known and un­ derstood. Ultrasound has been known to promote chemical reactions for the past 60 years, but despite this, it did not attract the attention of synthetic chemists until recently. This arose historically from early studies which concentrated almost exclu­ sively on reactions in aqueous media and was also, in some measure, due to the availability of suitable technology. Since the early 1980s a plethora of literature has appeared of direct interest to synthetic chemists and the field has been developing rapidly. The aim of this book is to bring the background of this fascinating field to the atten­ tion of a wider audience. It explores the literature to date and attempts to indicate other areas in which ultrasound may be exploited. It also hopes to explode some of the myths surrounding this area which have hitherto been regarded by the synthetic community as a bit of a black art! Existing books and reviews have tended to concentrate on the physics of sonochem­ istry and to catalogue the instances in which ultrasound has proved useful in tack­ ling synthetic problems. Our aim has been to stress the relevance of this technique to synthetic chemists and we have included a section which deals with the practical aspects of carrying out these reactions.

Keywords

alkali metal aluminium lithium magnesium metals synthesis transition metal ultrasound zinc

Authors and affiliations

  • Steven V. Ley
    • 1
  • Caroline M. R. Low
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of ChemistryImperial College of Science and TechnologySouth Kensington, LondonUK

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-74672-7
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1989
  • Publisher Name Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-3-642-74674-1
  • Online ISBN 978-3-642-74672-7
  • Series Print ISSN 0341-2377
  • Buy this book on publisher's site