The Electroencephalogram in Anesthesia

Fundamentals, Practical Applications, Examples

  • Ina Pichlmayr
  • Ulrich Lips
  • Helmut Künkel

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-vii
  2. Introduction to Electroencephalography in Anesthesiology

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 1-1
    2. Ina Pichlmayr, Ulrich Lips, Helmut Künkel
      Pages 2-11
    3. Ina Pichlmayr, Ulrich Lips, Helmut Künkel
      Pages 12-21
    4. Ina Pichlmayr, Ulrich Lips, Helmut Künkel
      Pages 22-32
    5. Ina Pichlmayr, Ulrich Lips, Helmut Künkel
      Pages 33-42
  3. Electroencephalographic Patterns Induced by Various Anesthetics and Perioperative Influences

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 43-43
    2. Ina Pichlmayr, Ulrich Lips, Helmut Künkel
      Pages 44-64
    3. Ina Pichlmayr, Ulrich Lips, Helmut Künkel
      Pages 65-71
    4. Ina Pichlmayr, Ulrich Lips, Helmut Künkel
      Pages 72-89
    5. Ina Pichlmayr, Ulrich Lips, Helmut Künkel
      Pages 90-123
    6. Ina Pichlmayr, Ulrich Lips, Helmut Künkel
      Pages 124-127
    7. Ina Pichlmayr, Ulrich Lips, Helmut Künkel
      Pages 128-145
    8. Ina Pichlmayr, Ulrich Lips, Helmut Künkel
      Pages 146-153
    9. Ina Pichlmayr, Ulrich Lips, Helmut Künkel
      Pages 154-163
    10. Ina Pichlmayr, Ulrich Lips, Helmut Künkel
      Pages 164-167
    11. Ina Pichlmayr, Ulrich Lips, Helmut Künkel
      Pages 168-172
  4. Electroencephalography as a Method of Anesthesiological Monitoring

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 173-173
    2. Ina Pichlmayr, Ulrich Lips, Helmut Künkel
      Pages 174-191
    3. Ina Pichlmayr, Ulrich Lips, Helmut Künkel
      Pages 192-196

About this book

Introduction

Neurological, neurovegetative, and psychic changes following surgery or in­ tensive care indicate alterations in cerebral function. When these changes are analyzed exactly, they are found to be by no means rare; at the same time, they present a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations. While optimal circulatory monitoring - including continuous EEG recording during anes­ thesia or intensive care - is today regarded as routine, the problem of objec­ tive and continuous monitoring of cerebral function under various forms of anesthesia, surgery, and intensive care has not been solved. Considerable improvements in clinical neurophysiology, mainly through visual and spectral analytic evaluations of the EEG, show func­ tional neurophysiological changes to be equivalent to, or the cause of, clinical, neurological, and psychic changes. The question of current interest, therefore, is whether anesthesiological EEG monitoring is able, both theo­ retically and practically, to detect and adequately interpret cerebral altera­ tions following perioperative measures such that these alterations can be treated or avoided accordingly. In the long run, the basic questions are to what extent can anesthesiological measures be guided by the EEG pattern and managed effectively, and can EEG analysis be significant both for the individual patient and in the general interpretation of the effect of anes­ thesiological procedures? Questions of the relevance and practicability of anesthesiological EEG monitoring are dealt with in this book. This study is based on an analysis of more than 1500 EEGs of patients who underwent anesthesia during surgery.

Keywords

Elektroenzephalographie Narkose electroencephalography (EEG) neurophysiology physiology

Authors and affiliations

  • Ina Pichlmayr
    • 1
  • Ulrich Lips
    • 1
  • Helmut Künkel
    • 2
  1. 1.Zentrum für Anästhesiologie der Medizinischen Hochschule Hannover, Abt. IVKrankenhaus OststadtHannover 51Germany
  2. 2.Zentrum Neurologische Medizin, Abt. IIInstitut für Klinische Neurophysiologie und Experimentelle NeurologieHannover 61Germany

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-69562-9
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1984
  • Publisher Name Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-3-642-69564-3
  • Online ISBN 978-3-642-69562-9