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Inferring from Language

  • Leonard G. M. Noordman

Part of the Springer Series in Language and Communication book series (SSLAN, volume 4)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages I-XII
  2. Introduction

    1. Leonard G. M. Noordman
      Pages 1-6
  3. Processing Comparative Relations

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 7-7
    2. Leonard G. M. Noordman
      Pages 8-22
    3. Leonard G. M. Noordman
      Pages 23-35
    4. Leonard G. M. Noordman
      Pages 36-52
    5. Leonard G. M. Noordman
      Pages 53-61
    6. Leonard G. M. Noordman
      Pages 62-64
  4. Processing Conditional Relations

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 65-65
    2. Leonard G. M. Noordman
      Pages 66-67
    3. Leonard G. M. Noordman
      Pages 68-87
    4. Leonard G. M. Noordman
      Pages 88-95
    5. Leonard G. M. Noordman
      Pages 96-112
  5. Foreground and Background Information in Inferential Processes

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 113-113
    2. Leonard G. M. Noordman
      Pages 114-117
    3. Leonard G. M. Noordman
      Pages 118-124
    4. Leonard G. M. Noordman
      Pages 125-128
    5. Leonard G. M. Noordman
      Pages 129-139
    6. Leonard G. M. Noordman
      Pages 140-145
    7. Leonard G. M. Noordman
      Pages 146-146
    8. Leonard G. M. Noordman
      Pages 147-153
  6. Back Matter
    Pages 155-172

About this book

Introduction

In the study of human thought there could hardly be a more fundamental con­ cern than language and reasoning. In the tradition of Western philosophy, humans are distinguished by their ability to speak and to think rationally. And language is often considered a prerequisite for rational thought. If psycholoQists, then, are ever to discover what is truly human about their species, they will have to discover how language is produced and understood, and how it plays a role in reasoning and other forms of rational thought. Within psychology there has been an imperative to study language and rea­ soning together. Since Wundt, psychologists have succeeded in building a the­ oretical foundation for both language and reasoning. What has become clear from these beginnings is that the two are inextricably bound to each other. Like the two players ina chess game, take away one of them and the game no longer exists. On the one hand, producing and understanding speech re­ quires an intricate process of reasoning. Speakers must rationally choose sentences that will affect their listeners in ways they intend, and listen­ ers must infer what speakers could conceivably have meant in selecting the sentences they did. Reasoning, inference, and rational thought lie at the very center of speaking and listening. On the other hand, logical reasoning begins with, and is influenced by, the language in which a problem is stated.

Keywords

Denken Language Sprache building cognition foundation humans philosophy psychology reason tradition will

Authors and affiliations

  • Leonard G. M. Noordman
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of GroningenThe Netherlands

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-67307-8
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1979
  • Publisher Name Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-3-642-67309-2
  • Online ISBN 978-3-642-67307-8
  • Series Print ISSN 0172-620X
  • Buy this book on publisher's site