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Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology

Ergebnisse der Mikrobiologie und Immunitätsforschung

  • W. Arber
  • W. Henle
  • P. H. Hofschneider
  • J. H. Humphrey
  • N. K. Jerne
  • P. Koldovský
  • H. Koprowski
  • O. Maaløe
  • R. Rott
  • H. G. Schweiger
  • M. Sela
  • L. Syruček
  • P. K. Vogt

Part of the Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology book series (CT MICROBIOLOGY, volume 70)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-iii
  2. Herbert A. Blough, John M. Tiffany
    Pages 1-30
  3. Back Matter
    Pages 121-129

About this book

Introduction

The processes involved in herpesvirus replication, latency, and oncogenic transformation, have, in general, been rather poorly defined. A primary reason for this is the size and complexity of the herpesvirus genome. Undoubtedly, a better understanding of the functions of the viral genome in infected and transformed cells will be achieved through studies with temperature-sensitive (ts) mutants of herpesviruses since, theoretically, any essential gene function can be affected by mutants of this type. A. The Herpesviruses A consideration of the genetic analysis of members of the herpesvirus group necessitates a description, albeit brief, of the properties of the group and, most importantly, of their genetic material. The herpesviruses comprise a group of relatively large (100-150 nm), enveloped viruses. The envelope surrounds an icosahedral capsid enclosing a core which contains double­ stranded DNA (ROIZMAN, 1969). The group is thus defined on the basis of a common virion morphology. In addition to a common structure, members of the group share a number of biological properties such as a similar replicative cycle, the ability to cause latent and chronic infections, and the ability to induce antigenic modifications of infected cell membranes. Several herpes­ viruses have been associated recently with malignancies in man and animals (KLEIN, 1972). Herpesviruses are ubiquitous and have been described in over 30 different species (HUNT and MELENDEZ, 1969; WILDY, 1971; FARLEY et aI. , 1972; KAZAMA and SCHORNSTEIN, 1972; NAHMIAS et aI. , 1972; ROlZMAN et aI. , 1973). Their widespread occurrence in nature suggests a common ancestor.

Keywords

Antigen Immunität animals biology cell cell membrane genes immunology infection infections microbiology virus

Editors and affiliations

  • W. Arber
    • 1
  • W. Henle
    • 2
  • P. H. Hofschneider
    • 3
  • J. H. Humphrey
    • 4
  • N. K. Jerne
    • 1
  • P. Koldovský
    • 2
  • H. Koprowski
    • 2
  • O. Maaløe
    • 5
  • R. Rott
    • 6
  • H. G. Schweiger
    • 7
  • M. Sela
    • 8
  • L. Syruček
    • 9
  • P. K. Vogt
    • 10
  1. 1.BasleSwitzerland
  2. 2.PhiladelphiaUSA
  3. 3.MartinsriedGermany
  4. 4.LondonUK
  5. 5.CopenhagenDenmark
  6. 6.GießenGermany
  7. 7.WilhelmshavenGermany
  8. 8.RehovotIsrael
  9. 9.PragueCzech Republic
  10. 10.SeattleUSA

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-66101-3
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1975
  • Publisher Name Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-3-642-66103-7
  • Online ISBN 978-3-642-66101-3
  • Series Print ISSN 0070-217X
  • Buy this book on publisher's site