Cerebellar Cortex

Cytology and Organization

  • Sanford L. Palay
  • Victoria Chan-Palay

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages I-XII
  2. Sanford L. Palay, Victoria Chan-Palay
    Pages 1-10
  3. Sanford L. Palay, Victoria Chan-Palay
    Pages 11-62
  4. Sanford L. Palay, Victoria Chan-Palay
    Pages 63-99
  5. Sanford L. Palay, Victoria Chan-Palay
    Pages 100-132
  6. Sanford L. Palay, Victoria Chan-Palay
    Pages 133-141
  7. Sanford L. Palay, Victoria Chan-Palay
    Pages 142-179
  8. Sanford L. Palay, Victoria Chan-Palay
    Pages 180-215
  9. Sanford L. Palay, Victoria Chan-Palay
    Pages 216-233
  10. Sanford L. Palay, Victoria Chan-Palay
    Pages 234-241
  11. Sanford L. Palay, Victoria Chan-Palay
    Pages 242-287
  12. Sanford L. Palay, Victoria Chan-Palay
    Pages 288-321
  13. Sanford L. Palay, Victoria Chan-Palay
    Pages 322-336
  14. Back Matter
    Pages 337-350

About this book

Introduction

The origins of this book go back to the first electron microscopic studies of the central nervous system. The cerebellar cortex was from the first an object of close study in the electron microscope, repeating in modern cytology and neuroanatomy the role it had in the hands of RAMON y CAJAL at the end of the nineteenth century. The senior author vividly remembers a day early in 1953 when GEORGE PALADE, with whom he was then working, showed him an electron micrograph of a cerebellar glomerulus, saying "That is what the synapse should look like. " It is true that the tissue was swollen and the mitochondria were exploded, but all of the essentials of synaptic structure were visible. At that time small fragments of tissue, fixed by immersion in osmium tetroxide and embedded in methacrylate, were laboriously sectioned with glass knives without any predetermined orientation and then examined in the electron microscope. After much searching, favorably preserved areas' were studied at the cytological level in order to recognize the parts of neurons and characterize them. Such procedures, dependent upon random sections and uncontrollable selection by a highly erratic technique of preservation, precluded any systematic investigation of the organization of a particular nucleus or region of the central nervous system. It was difficult enough to distinguish neurons from the neuroglia.

Keywords

Gehirnrinde anatomy central nervous system cytology nervous system tissue

Authors and affiliations

  • Sanford L. Palay
    • 1
  • Victoria Chan-Palay
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Anatomy and NeurobiologyHavard Medical SchoolBostonUSA

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-65581-4
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1974
  • Publisher Name Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-3-642-65583-8
  • Online ISBN 978-3-642-65581-4
  • About this book