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Taste

  • T. E. Acree
  • J. Atema
  • J. E. Bardach
  • L. M. Bartoshuk
  • L. M. Beidler
  • R. M. Benjamin
  • R. M. Bradley
  • Z. Bujas
  • H. Burton
  • L. P. Cole
  • A. I. Farbman
  • L. Guth
  • H. Kalmus
  • M. Kare
  • K. Kurihara
  • D. H. McBurney
  • R. G. Murray
  • M. Nachman
  • C. Pfaffmann
  • M. Sato
  • R. S. Shallenberger
  • Y. Zotterman
  • Lloyd M. Beidler

Part of the Handbook of Sensory Physiology book series (SENSORY, volume 4 / 2)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-viii
  2. Robert M. Bradley
    Pages 1-30
  3. Raymond G. Murray
    Pages 31-50
  4. Albert I. Farbman
    Pages 51-62
  5. Carl Pfaffmann, Linda M. Bartoshuk, Donald H. McBurney
    Pages 75-101
  6. Harold Burton, Robert M. Benjamin
    Pages 148-164
  7. Hans Kalmus
    Pages 165-179
  8. Zoran Bujas
    Pages 180-199
  9. Lloyd M. Beidler
    Pages 200-220
  10. R. S. Shallenberger, T. E. Acree
    Pages 221-277
  11. Morley Kare
    Pages 278-292
  12. John E. Bardach, Jelle Atema
    Pages 293-336
  13. Marvin Nachman, Loretta P. Cole
    Pages 337-362
  14. Kenzo Kurihara
    Pages 363-378
  15. Back Matter
    Pages 379-426

About this book

Introduction

Taste receptors monitor the quality of all the food ingested. They are intimately involved in both food acceptance and rejection. The sensation of taste is also important in the regulation of many specific chemicals necessary for maintenance of the body. For example, disturbance of the adrenal glands results in a change in the intake of salt which is necessary for regulation of the sodium balance. Curt Richter's early studies on specific hungers and preference thresholds initiated a large number of studies in this field. The relationship between taste and food intake is now well recognized by physiologists, psychologists and nutritionists. Our current concepts of the neural coding of taste quality and intensity are largely based upon the classical paper by PFAFFMANN in 1941. Many subsequent single nerve fiber studies have added to our understanding. In recent years Zotterman and Diamant have successfully recorded from the human taste nerves as they pass through the middle ear. This allowed them to study the relationships between the response of taste receptors and the resultant taste sensation. No similar feat has yet been accomplished with the visual and auditory systems.

Keywords

Geschmacksorgan ear nutrition physics quality regulation relationships

Authors and affiliations

  • T. E. Acree
    • 1
  • J. Atema
    • 2
  • J. E. Bardach
    • 3
  • L. M. Bartoshuk
    • 4
  • L. M. Beidler
    • 5
  • R. M. Benjamin
    • 6
  • R. M. Bradley
    • 7
  • Z. Bujas
    • 8
  • H. Burton
    • 9
  • L. P. Cole
    • 10
  • A. I. Farbman
    • 11
  • L. Guth
    • 12
  • H. Kalmus
    • 13
  • M. Kare
    • 14
  • K. Kurihara
    • 15
  • D. H. McBurney
    • 16
  • R. G. Murray
    • 17
  • M. Nachman
    • 18
  • C. Pfaffmann
    • 19
  • M. Sato
    • 20
  • R. S. Shallenberger
    • 1
  • Y. Zotterman
    • 21
  1. 1.New York State Agricultural Experiment StationCornell UniversityGenevaUSA
  2. 2.Chemotaxis Laboratory, Chemistry DepartmentWoods Hole Oceanographic InstitutionWoods HoleUSA
  3. 3.Hawaii Institute of Marine BiologyKaneoheUSA
  4. 4.John B. Pierce Foundation Laboratory and Yale UniversityNew HavenUSA
  5. 5.Department of Biological ScienceThe Florida State UniversityTallahasseeUSA
  6. 6.Laboratory of Neurophysiology and Department of PhysiologyUniversity Wisconsin Medical CenterMadisonUSA
  7. 7.Nuffield Institute for Medical ResearchUniversity of OxfordOxford, HeadingtonGreat Britain
  8. 8.Filozofski FakultetPsihologijski InstitutZagrebJugoslavia
  9. 9.Department of AnatomyWashington University School of MedicineSt. LouisUSA
  10. 10.Department of PsychologyUniversity of WaterlooWaterlooCanada
  11. 11.Department of AnatomyNorthwestern UniversityChicagoUSA
  12. 12.National Institutes of HealthBethesdaUSA
  13. 13.The Galton LaboratoryUniversity CollegeLondon, W. C. 1Great Britain
  14. 14.Monell Chemical Senses CenterUniversity of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA
  15. 15.Biological Laboratory, Faculty of ScienceTokyo Institute of TechnologyMeguro-ku, TokyoJapan
  16. 16.Department of PsychologyUniversity of PittsburghPittsburghUSA
  17. 17.Department of Anatomy and PhysiologyIndiana UniversityBloomingtonUSA
  18. 18.Department of PsychologyUniversity of CaliforniaRiversideUSA
  19. 19.The Rockefeller UniversityNew YorkUSA
  20. 20.Department of PhysiologyKumamoto University Medical SchoolKumamoto 860Japan
  21. 21.Department of PhysiologyKungl. VeterinärhögskolanStockholm 50Sweden

Editors and affiliations

  • Lloyd M. Beidler
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Biological ScienceThe Florida State UniversityTallahasseeUSA

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-65245-5
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1971
  • Publisher Name Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-3-642-65247-9
  • Online ISBN 978-3-642-65245-5
  • Series Print ISSN 0072-9906
  • Buy this book on publisher's site