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Introduction to the Theory of Heavy-Ion Collisions

  • Wolfgang Nörenberg
  • Hans A. Weidenmüller

Part of the Lecture Notes in Physics book series (LNP, volume 51)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages N2-IX
  2. Wolfgang Nörenberg, Hans A. Weidenmüller
    Pages 1-3
  3. Wolfgang Nörenberg, Hans A. Weidenmüller
    Pages 3-41
  4. Wolfgang Nörenberg, Hans A. Weidenmüller
    Pages 42-79
  5. Wolfgang Nörenberg, Hans A. Weidenmüller
    Pages 80-88
  6. Wolfgang Nörenberg, Hans A. Weidenmüller
    Pages 89-151
  7. Wolfgang Nörenberg, Hans A. Weidenmüller
    Pages 152-177
  8. Wolfgang Nörenberg, Hans A. Weidenmüller
    Pages 178-222
  9. Wolfgang Nörenberg, Hans A. Weidenmüller
    Pages 223-251
  10. Wolfgang Nörenberg, Hans A. Weidenmüller
    Pages 252-268
  11. Back Matter
    Pages 269-277

About this book

Introduction

With the advent of heavy-ion reactions, nuclear physics has acquired a new frontier. The new heavy-ion sources operating at electrostatic accelerators and the high-energy experiments performed at Berkeley, Dubna, Manchester and Orsay, have opened up the field, and have shown us impressive new prospects. The new accelerators now under construction at Berlin, Daresbury and Darmstadt, as well as those under consideration (GANIL, Oak Ridge, etc. ) are expected to add significantly to our knowledge and understanding of nuclear properties. This applies not only to such exotic topics as the existence and lifetimes of superheavy elements, or the possibil­ ity of shock waves in nuclei, but also to such more mundane issues as high-spin states, new regions of deformed nuclei and friction forces. The field promises not only to produce a rich variety of interesting phenomena, but also to have wide-spread theoretical implications. Heavy-ion reactions are characterized by the large masses of the fragments, as well as the high total energy and the large total angular momentum typically involved in the collision. A purely quantum-mechanical description of such a collision process may be too complicated to be either possible or inter­ esting. We expect and, in some cases,know that the classical limit, the limit of geometrical optics, a quantum-statistical or a hydrodynamical description correctly account for typical features.

Keywords

energy nuclear physics optics physics scattering

Authors and affiliations

  • Wolfgang Nörenberg
    • 1
  • Hans A. Weidenmüller
    • 1
  1. 1.Max-Planck-Institut für KernphysikHeidelbergGermany

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-540-38271-3
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1976
  • Publisher Name Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-3-540-09753-2
  • Online ISBN 978-3-540-38271-3
  • Series Print ISSN 0075-8450
  • Series Online ISSN 1616-6361
  • Buy this book on publisher's site