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Narrating Citizenship and Belonging in Anglophone Canadian Literature

  • Katja Sarkowsky

Table of contents

About this book

Introduction

This book examines how concepts of citizenship have been negotiated in Anglophone Canadian literature since the 1970s. Katja Sarkowsky argues that literary texts conceptualize citizenship as political “co-actorship” and as cultural “co-authorship” (Boele van Hensbroek), using citizenship as a metaphor of ambivalent affiliations within and beyond Canada. In its exploration of urban, indigenous, environmental, and diasporic citizenship as well as of citizenship’s growing entanglement with questions of human rights, Canadian literature reflects and feeds into the term’s conceptual diversification. Exploring the works of Guillermo Verdecchia, Joy Kogawa, Jeannette Armstrong, Maria Campbell, Cheryl Foggo, Fred Wah, Michael Ondaatje, and Dionne Brand, this text investigates how citizenship functions to denote emplaced practices of participation in multiple collectives that are not restricted to the framework of the nation-state.

Keywords

affective membership language of citizenship formal membership affective belonging human rights citizenship and minorities marginalized groups Canadian literature transnational citizenship transnational literature

Authors and affiliations

  • Katja Sarkowsky
    • 1
  1. 1.Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität MünsterMünsterGermany

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-96935-0
  • Copyright Information The Editor(s) (if applicable) and The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG, part of Springer Nature 2018
  • Publisher Name Palgrave Macmillan, Cham
  • eBook Packages Literature, Cultural and Media Studies
  • Print ISBN 978-3-319-96934-3
  • Online ISBN 978-3-319-96935-0
  • Buy this book on publisher's site