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Mycoremediation and Environmental Sustainability

Volume 2

  • Ram Prasad

Part of the Fungal Biology book series (FUNGBIO)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xvii
  2. Necdet Saglam, Ozfer Yesilada, Semran Saglam, Elif Apohan, Mesut Sam, Sedef Ilk et al.
    Pages 1-37
  3. Jyotika Purohit, Anirudha Chattopadhyay, Mohan K. Biswas, Nirbhay K. Singh
    Pages 91-120
  4. Ozfer Yesilada, Emre Birhanli, Hikmet Geckil
    Pages 121-153
  5. Chitra Pandey, Deepti Prabha, Yogesh Kumar Negi
    Pages 155-179
  6. Debasish Mohapatra, Sakti Kanta Rath, Pradipta Kumar Mohapatra
    Pages 181-212
  7. Rocío Reina, Mercedes García-Sánchez, Christiane Liers, Inmaculada García-Romera, Elisabet Aranda
    Pages 213-238
  8. Albino A. Dias, Joana M. C. Fernandes, Rose Marie O. F. Sousa, Paula A. Pinto, Carla Amaral, Ana Sampaio et al.
    Pages 239-252
  9. Deepanwita Deka, Jintu Rabha, Dhruva Kumar Jha
    Pages 273-305
  10. V. Venkateswara Sarma
    Pages 307-323
  11. Poonam C. Singh, Sonal Srivastava, Deepali Shukla, Vidisha Bist, Pratibha Tripathi, Vandana Anand et al.
    Pages 351-381
  12. Back Matter
    Pages 383-392

About this book

Introduction

Bioremediation is the use of microorganisms' metabolism to degrade waste contaminants (sewage, domestic, and industrial effluents) into non-toxic or less toxic materials by natural biological processes. Remediation through fungi—or mycoremediation—has multifarious possibilities in applied remediation engineering and the future of environmental sustainability. Fungi have the biochemical and ecological capability to degrade environmental organic chemicals and to decrease the risk associated with metals, semi-metals, noble metals, and radionuclides, either by chemical modification or by manipulating chemical bioavailability. Additionally, the capability of these fungi to form extended mycelia networks, the low specificity of their catabolic enzymes, and their using pollutants as a growth substrate make these fungi well suited for bioremediation processes. Their mycelia exhibit the robustness of adapting to highly limiting environmental conditions often experienced in the presence of persistent pollutants, which makes them more useful compared to other microbes. However, despite dominating the living biomass in soil and being abundant in aquatic ecosystems, fungi have not been exploited for the bioremediation of such environments. This book covers the various types of fungi and associated fungal processes used to clean up waste and wastewaters in contaminated environments and discusses future potential applications.

Keywords

Bioremediation Fungi Decolorization Soil pollution Nanotechnology Agricultural by-products Waste

Editors and affiliations

  • Ram Prasad
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Environmental Science and EngineeringSun Yat-Sen UniversityGuangzhouChina

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-77386-5
  • Copyright Information Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018
  • Publisher Name Springer, Cham
  • eBook Packages Biomedical and Life Sciences
  • Print ISBN 978-3-319-77385-8
  • Online ISBN 978-3-319-77386-5
  • Series Print ISSN 2198-7777
  • Series Online ISSN 2198-7785
  • Buy this book on publisher's site