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© 2017

Independent Commissions and Contentious Issues in Post-Good Friday Agreement Northern Ireland

Book

Part of the Rethinking Peace and Conflict Studies book series (RCS)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xv
  2. Dawn Walsh
    Pages 29-56
  3. Dawn Walsh
    Pages 87-117
  4. Dawn Walsh
    Pages 119-147
  5. Dawn Walsh
    Pages 149-176
  6. Dawn Walsh
    Pages 177-191
  7. Back Matter
    Pages 193-236

About this book

Introduction

“This richly original account of the role of independent commissions in resolving some of the most difficult and controversial issues in the Northern Ireland Peace Process provides an important and timely analysis that greatly enhances our understanding of the role of such commissions. It highlights the way in which they facilitate ongoing involvement by the international community in the implementation of peace settlements and outlines the way in which they play a mediating role between fiercely opposed views. This much-needed study helps to set a new agenda for research on this important but neglected aspect of peace processes.”
 
Niall O’Dochartaigh, National University of Ireland Galway, Republic of Ireland

Keywords

Good Friday Agreement Northern Ireland IRA NIHRC Independent Monitoring Commission

Authors and affiliations

  1. 1.IICRRDublin City UniversityDublinIreland

About the authors

Dr Walsh is currently an Irish Research Council-Marie Curie Elevate post-doctoral fellow at Dublin City University, UK. This fellowship examines the role of territorial self-governance in conflict management. Her research interests also include the creation of innovative institutions to manage conflict, the implementation of peace agreements and the role on international actors in facilitating peace agreements.

Bibliographic information

  • Book Title Independent Commissions and Contentious Issues in Post-Good Friday Agreement Northern Ireland
  • Authors Dawn Walsh
  • Series Title Rethinking Peace and Conflict Studies
  • Series Abbreviated Title Rethinking Peace and Conflict Studies
  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-50772-9
  • Copyright Information The Editor(s) (if applicable) and The Author(s) 2017
  • Publisher Name Palgrave Macmillan, Cham
  • eBook Packages Political Science and International Studies Political Science and International Studies (R0)
  • Hardcover ISBN 978-3-319-50771-2
  • Softcover ISBN 978-3-319-84488-6
  • eBook ISBN 978-3-319-50772-9
  • Edition Number 1
  • Number of Pages XV, 236
  • Number of Illustrations 0 b/w illustrations, 0 illustrations in colour
  • Topics Political History
    Peace Studies
  • Buy this book on publisher's site

Reviews

“This richly original account of the role of independent commissions in resolving some of the most difficult and controversial issues in the Northern Ireland Peace Process provides an important and timely analysis that greatly enhances our understanding of the role of such commissions. It highlights the way in which they facilitate ongoing involvement by the international community in the implementation of peace settlements and outlines the way in which they play a mediating role between fiercely opposed views. This much-needed study helps to set a new agenda for research on this important but neglected aspect of peace processes.” (Niall O’Dochartaigh, National University of Ireland Galway, Republic of Ireland)

“Walsh offers an empirically extremely rich, theoretically well-grounded study on a very significant aspect of the implementation of the 1998 Northern Ireland Agreement. Her conclusions are insightful and have relevance for conflict settlement processes far beyond Northern Ireland.” (Stefan Wolff, Professor of International Security, University of Birmingham, UK)

“Walsh has produced the best book to date on the role of international commissions in the Northern Ireland peace process. She offers an important comparison of the different commissions and their role especially in implementing the Good Friday or Belfast Agreement. She identifies how they were critical in helping to overcome issues not resolved in the Agreement itself and helped overcome the key problems in implementing The Agreement. They did this by ensuring that the identity and expertise of the members of the commissions provided these third parties legitimacy as mediators on difficult issues like police reform and decommissioning. Her analysis is not important just for the conflict in Northern Ireland but is instructive more generally on the role of third parties in international conflicts.” (Timothy J. White, Professor of Political Science, Xavier University, USA)