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Gene Expression and Its Discontents

The Social Production of Chronic Disease

  • Rodrick Wallace
  • Deborah Wallace

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xiii
  2. Rodrick Wallace, Deborah Wallace
    Pages 1-25
  3. Rodrick Wallace, Deborah Wallace
    Pages 27-34
  4. Rodrick Wallace, Deborah Wallace
    Pages 35-41
  5. Rodrick Wallace, Deborah Wallace
    Pages 43-54
  6. Rodrick Wallace, Deborah Wallace
    Pages 55-62
  7. Rodrick Wallace, Deborah Wallace
    Pages 63-65
  8. Rodrick Wallace, Deborah Wallace
    Pages 67-86
  9. Rodrick Wallace, Deborah Wallace
    Pages 87-105
  10. Rodrick Wallace, Deborah Wallace
    Pages 107-120
  11. Rodrick Wallace, Deborah Wallace
    Pages 121-139
  12. Rodrick Wallace, Deborah Wallace
    Pages 141-159
  13. Rodrick Wallace, Deborah Wallace
    Pages 161-179
  14. Rodrick Wallace, Deborah Wallace
    Pages 181-193
  15. Rodrick Wallace, Deborah Wallace
    Pages 195-206
  16. Rodrick Wallace, Deborah Wallace
    Pages 207-222
  17. Rodrick Wallace, Deborah Wallace
    Pages 223-235
  18. Rodrick Wallace, Deborah Wallace
    Pages 237-249
  19. Rodrick Wallace, Deborah Wallace
    Pages 251-268
  20. Rodrick Wallace, Deborah Wallace
    Pages 269-284
  21. Rodrick Wallace, Deborah Wallace
    Pages 285-293
  22. Rodrick Wallace, Deborah Wallace
    Pages 295-314
  23. Back Matter
    Pages 315-344

About this book

Introduction

This book describes how epigenetic context, in a large sense, affects gene expression and the development of an organism, using the asymptotic limit theorems of information theory to construct statistical models useful in data analysis. The approach allows deep understanding of how embedding context affects development. We find that epigenetic information sources act as tunable catalysts, directing ontogeny into characteristic pathways, a perspective having important implications for epigenetic epidemiology. In sum, environmental stressors can induce a broad spectrum of developmental dysfunctions, and the book explores a number of pandemic chronic diseases, using U.S. data at different scales and levels of organization. In particular, we find the legacy of slavery has been grossly compounded by accelerating industrial decline and urban decay. Individual chapters are dedicated to obesity and its sequelae, coronary heart disease, cancer, mental disorders, autoimmune dysfunction, Alzheimer’s disease, and other conditions. Developmental disorders are driven by environmental factors channeled by historical trajectory and are unlikely to respond to medical interventions at the population level in the face of persistent individual and community stress. Drugs powerful enough to affect deleterious epigenetic programming will likely have side effects leading to shortened lifespan. Addressing chronic conditions and developmental disorders requires significant large-scale changes in public policy and resource allocation.

Keywords

AIDS Cancer Epidemiology Obesity gene expression genes genetic epidemiology

Authors and affiliations

  • Rodrick Wallace
    • 1
  • Deborah Wallace
    • 2
  1. 1.Division of EpidemiologyThe New York State Psychiatric Institute at Columbia UniversityNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.New YorkUSA

Bibliographic information