Advertisement

Infostorms

Why do we 'like'? Explaining individual behavior on the social net.

  • Vincent F. Hendricks
  • Pelle G. Hansen

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xxiii
  2. Vincent F. Hendricks, Pelle G. Hansen
    Pages 1-11
  3. How Information Technologies May Amplify Irrational Group Behavior

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 13-13
    2. Vincent F. Hendricks, Pelle G. Hansen
      Pages 15-39
    3. Vincent F. Hendricks, Pelle G. Hansen
      Pages 41-60
    4. Vincent F. Hendricks, Pelle G. Hansen
      Pages 61-82
  4. Why Free Choice, Markets and Deliberation Cannot Protect Us

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 83-83
    2. Vincent F. Hendricks, Pelle G. Hansen
      Pages 85-103
    3. Vincent F. Hendricks, Pelle G. Hansen
      Pages 105-128
    4. Vincent F. Hendricks, Pelle G. Hansen
      Pages 129-154
    5. Vincent F. Hendricks, Pelle G. Hansen
      Pages 155-182
  5. Wars, Bubbles and Democracy

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 183-183
    2. Vincent F. Hendricks, Pelle G. Hansen
      Pages 185-204
    3. Vincent F. Hendricks, Pelle G. Hansen
      Pages 205-241
    4. Vincent F. Hendricks, Pelle G. Hansen
      Pages 243-261
  6. Postscript: The Social Power of Information Architecture

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 263-263
    2. Vincent F. Hendricks, Pelle G. Hansen
      Pages 265-287
  7. Back Matter
    Pages 289-306

About this book

Introduction

The information society is upon us. New technologies have given us back pocket libraries, online discussion forums, blogs, crowdbased opinion aggregators, social media and breaking news wherever, whenever. But are we more enlightened and rational because of it?

With points of departure in philosophy, logic, social psychology, economics, and choice and game theory, Infostorms shows how information may be used to improve the quality of personal decisions and group thinking but also warns against the informatonal pitfalls which modern information technology may amplify: From science to reality culture and what it really is, that makes you buy a book like this.

"With this brilliant book, we have been warned. It is up to all of us in the world today to be stewards of the common resource that is trustworthy and relevant information”.

Adam Brandenburger, Stern School of Business, NYU

“It is a highly recommended read for social scientists and concerned citizens alike”.

Christian List, London School of Economic

Keywords

bandwagon effects belief aggregation belief polarization bubbles in science and society bystander effects crowd-sourced opinion cyber-bullying framing effects free choice and democracy information and manipulation information technology informational cascades irrational group behavior likes as public signals pluralistic ignorance social media and group thinking upvotes and crowd-aggregated opinion upvotes and public opinion social psychology lemming effects

Authors and affiliations

  • Vincent F. Hendricks
    • 1
  • Pelle G. Hansen
    • 2
  1. 1.University of CopenhagenCenter for Information and Bubble Studies (CIBS)Copenhagen SDenmark
  2. 2.Dept. of Communication and ArtsDesigning Human Technologies, Roskilde UniversityOdense MDenmark

Bibliographic information