Divided Languages?

Diglossia, Translation and the Rise of Modernity in Japan, China, and the Slavic World

Editors:

ISBN: 978-3-319-03520-8 (Print) 978-3-319-03521-5 (Online)

Table of contents (13 chapters)

  1. Front Matter

    Pages i-xiii

  2. Diglossia and Functional Variation

    1. Front Matter

      Pages 1-1

    2. No Access

      Chapter

      Pages 3-19

      Understanding the Essence of Diglossia

    3. No Access

      Chapter

      Pages 21-37

      Czech Diglossia: Dismantling or Dissolution?

    4. No Access

      Chapter

      Pages 39-54

      Diglossia and Its Discontent: The Linguistics of National Crisis in Early Twentieth-Century China

    5. No Access

      Chapter

      Pages 55-63

      Diglossia in China: Past and Present

    6. No Access

      Chapter

      Pages 65-86

      Shifting Patterns of Chinese Diglossia: Why the Dialects May Be Headed for Extinction

  3. Linguistic Awareness and Changing Perceptions of Varieties

    1. Front Matter

      Pages 87-87

    2. No Access

      Chapter

      Pages 89-103

      Discourse on Poetic Language in Early Modern Japan and the Awareness of Linguistic Change

    3. No Access

      Chapter

      Pages 105-118

      Genbun itchi and Questione della lingua: Theoretical Intersections in the Creation of a New Written Language in Meiji Japan and Renaissance Italy

    4. No Access

      Chapter

      Pages 119-140

      Linguistic Awareness and Language Use: The Chinese Literati at the Beginning of the Twentieth Century

    5. No Access

      Chapter

      Pages 141-158

      Homogenization or Hierarchization?: A Problem of Written Language in the Public Sphere of Modern Japan

  4. Diglossia and Translation

    1. Front Matter

      Pages 159-159

    2. No Access

      Chapter

      Pages 161-180

      Modeling the Shifting Face of the Discourse Mediator

    3. No Access

      Chapter

      Pages 181-205

      Translation Within the Polyglossic Linguistic System of Early Meiji-Period Japan

    4. No Access

      Chapter

      Pages 207-222

      Genbun itchi and Literary Translations in Later Nineteenth-Century Japan: The Role of Literary Translations in Forming the “De-aru” Style

    5. No Access

      Chapter

      Pages 223-259

      The Role of Russian in the Dissolution of Diglossia in Japan: Translations by Futabatei Shimei