Frames and Concept Types

Applications in Language and Philosophy

ISBN: 978-3-319-01540-8 (Print) 978-3-319-01541-5 (Online)

Table of contents (15 chapters)

  1. Front Matter

    Pages i-x

  2. Introduction to Frames and Concept Types

    1. Front Matter

      Pages 1-1

    2. No Access

      Chapter

      Pages 3-21

      General Introduction

    3. No Access

      Chapter

      Pages 23-67

      Evidence for Frames from Human Language

    4. No Access

      Chapter

      Pages 69-89

      From Features via Frames to Spaces: Modeling Scientific Conceptual Change Without Incommensurability or Aprioricity

  3. Frame Analysis of Changes in Scientific Concepts

    1. Front Matter

      Pages 91-91

    2. No Access

      Chapter

      Pages 93-109

      Reconstructing Scientific Theory Change by Means of Frames

    3. No Access

      Chapter

      Pages 111-122

      Interests in Conceptual Changes: A Frame Analysis

  4. Event Frames and Lexical Decomposition

    1. Front Matter

      Pages 123-123

    2. No Access

      Chapter

      Pages 125-156

      FrameNet, Frame Structure, and the Syntax-Semantics Interface

    3. No Access

      Chapter

      Pages 157-176

      The Deep Lexical Semantics of Event Words

  5. Properties, Frame Attributes and Adjectives

    1. Front Matter

      Pages 177-177

    2. No Access

      Chapter

      Pages 179-197

      Distinguishing Properties and Relations in the Denotation of Adjectives: An Empirical Investigation

    3. No Access

      Chapter

      Pages 199-218

      Why Chocolate Eggs Can Taste Old but Not Oval: A Frame-Theoretic Analysis of Inferential Evidentials

  6. Frames in Concept Composition

    1. Front Matter

      Pages 219-219

    2. No Access

      Chapter

      Pages 221-242

      A Frame Approach to Metonymical Processes in Some Common Types of German Word Formation

    3. No Access

      Chapter

      Pages 243-266

      Concept Composition in Frames: Focusing on Genitive Constructions

  7. Nominal Concept Types and Determination

    1. Front Matter

      Pages 267-267

    2. No Access

      Chapter

      Pages 269-292

      Definitely Not Possessed? Possessive Suffixes with Definiteness Marking Function

    3. No Access

      Chapter

      Pages 293-321

      Definite Article Asymmetries and Concept Types: Semantic and Pragmatic Uniqueness

    4. No Access

      Chapter

      Pages 323-341

      The Indefiniteness of Definiteness

    5. No Access

      Chapter

      Pages 343-362

      Nominal Concept Types in German Fictional Texts