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Seriation by Children

An Artificial Intelligence Analysis of a Piagetian Task

  • Authors
  • Richard M. Young

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages ii-xii
  2. Richard M. Young
    Pages 1-20
  3. Richard M. Young
    Pages 21-32
  4. Richard M. Young
    Pages 33-39
  5. Richard M. Young
    Pages 40-54
  6. Richard M. Young
    Pages 55-59
  7. Richard M. Young
    Pages 60-72
  8. Richard M. Young
    Pages 73-145
  9. Richard M. Young
    Pages 146-166
  10. Richard M. Young
    Pages 167-191
  11. Richard M. Young
    Pages 192-193
  12. Richard M. Young
    Pages 194-222
  13. Richard M. Young
    Pages 223-238
  14. Richard M. Young
    Pages 239-244
  15. Back Matter
    Pages 245-325

About this book

Introduction

A four year old child sits in front of a heap of wooden blocks and tries to stand them in a straight line in order of size. There is no doubt that he understands the task, for he can distinguish between correct and incorrect solutions. Yet no matter how he arranges and rearranges the blocks, they seem obstinately to refuse to be aligned into the desired staircase­ like pattern. A year later he does much better: he can seriate six blocks differing in length by about an inch. But faced with eight of the blocks, or with six blocks differing by only half an inch, he is again unable to complete the task. He manages to build an ordered line, but leaves out one or two of the blocks: or perhaps he organises the blocks into two distinct lines and then finds himself unable to combine them. A year later still and he is now an accomplished performer. Presented with any seriation task involving the wooden blocks he carries it out smoothly, confidently, and correctly [1].

Keywords

artificial intelligence boundary element method intelligence pattern production

Bibliographic information