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© 2020

The Depoliticisation of Greece’s Public Revenue Administration

Radical Change and the Limits of Conditionality

  • Analyses the depoliticisation of Greece’s public revenue administration

  • Examines the implementation of the reform in the context of the country’s post-2010 bailouts

  • Features research involving interviews with several current and past key officeholders

Book

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xvi
  2. Dionyssis Dimitrakopoulos, Argyris Passas
    Pages 1-33
  3. Dionyssis Dimitrakopoulos, Argyris Passas
    Pages 35-57
  4. Dionyssis Dimitrakopoulos, Argyris Passas
    Pages 59-77
  5. Dionyssis Dimitrakopoulos, Argyris Passas
    Pages 79-108
  6. Dionyssis Dimitrakopoulos, Argyris Passas
    Pages 109-146
  7. Dionyssis Dimitrakopoulos, Argyris Passas
    Pages 147-157
  8. Back Matter
    Pages 159-163

About this book

Introduction

This book analyses the reform of Greece’s public revenue administration promoted by its international lenders under the successive bailout agreements put in place since 2010. In particular, it shows how an integral part of the finance ministry was converted into an independent agency operating largely outside the direct control of the finance minister. The authors focus on the implementation of this major reform and demonstrate the impact of domestic decisions on the increasing specificity of the international lenders’ demands and the concomitant lack of confidence in the Greek political élite’s commitment to the reform package.

This book helps readers understand the response to the eurozone crisis (especially, the conditionality of funding), Greece’s reform capacity with a focus on its tax administration, and the expansion of the scope of non-majoritarian institutions in Western democracies.

Keywords

Conditionality Public revenue administration Greece European Union Eurozone crisis QUANGOs Non-majotarian institutions Tax collection Finance ministry Public finance Greek debt crisis Europeanisation

Authors and affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PoliticsBirkbeck, University of LondonLondonUK
  2. 2.Department of International European and Area StudiesPanteion University of Social and Political SciencesAthensGreece

About the authors

Dionyssis Dimitrakopoulos is Senior Lecturer in Politics at Birkbeck College, University of London, where he directs the MSc programme in European politics and policy. He has won research funding from, inter alia, the ESRC, the British Academy, the Leverhulme Trust, and the European Union. He has published widely on the politics of European integration.  His work has appeared in leading academic journals such as Political Studies, the European Journal of Political Research, the Journal of Public Policy, the European Journal of International Relations, the Journal of Common Market Studies and the Journal of European Public Policy.


Anargyros (Argyris) Passas is Associate Professor of State Administration and European Integration, with the Department of International, European and Area Studies of the School of International Studies, Communication and Culture, Panteion University and holds a Jean Monnet Chair in Public Administration & European Integration (2014-2017).  He is the founding Director of the Centre for Institutional and Policy Analysis of the Panteion University, President of the Governing Board of the Hellenic University Association for European Studies (ECSA/Greece) and co-director of the book series "Public Policy and Institutional Analysis", Papazissis Publishers, Athens.  He teaches at Panteion University, the Hellenic Open University, the National Centre of Public Administration and Local Government and is a regular research and teaching associate with the Cyprus Academy of Public Administration. He has published books, articles and studies in journals and edited volumes in Greece and abroad, in the fields of European Integration, Public Policy and Public Administration.

Bibliographic information