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Controlled Environment Horticulture

Improving Quality of Vegetables and Medicinal Plants

  • Christoph-Martin Geilfus

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages I-XV
  2. Introduction

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 1-1
    2. Christoph-Martin Geilfus
      Pages 3-5
    3. Christoph-Martin Geilfus
      Pages 7-17
    4. Christoph-Martin Geilfus
      Pages 19-33
    5. Christoph-Martin Geilfus
      Pages 35-40
  3. II

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 41-42
    2. Christoph-Martin Geilfus
      Pages 43-56
    3. Christoph-Martin Geilfus
      Pages 57-67
    4. Christoph-Martin Geilfus
      Pages 69-80
    5. Christoph-Martin Geilfus
      Pages 81-97
    6. Christoph-Martin Geilfus
      Pages 99-111
    7. Christoph-Martin Geilfus
      Pages 113-120
    8. Christoph-Martin Geilfus
      Pages 121-129
    9. Christoph-Martin Geilfus
      Pages 131-143
    10. Christoph-Martin Geilfus
      Pages 145-150
    11. Christoph-Martin Geilfus
      Pages 151-162
    12. Christoph-Martin Geilfus
      Pages 163-173
    13. Christoph-Martin Geilfus
      Pages 175-185
  4. III

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 187-187
    2. Christoph-Martin Geilfus
      Pages 189-194
    3. Christoph-Martin Geilfus
      Pages 195-197
    4. Christoph-Martin Geilfus
      Pages 199-205
    5. Christoph-Martin Geilfus
      Pages 207-209
    6. Christoph-Martin Geilfus
      Pages 211-214
    7. Christoph-Martin Geilfus
      Pages 215-223
  5. Back Matter
    Pages 225-233

About this book

Introduction

An understanding of crop physiology and ecophysiology enables the horticulturist to manipulate a plant’s metabolism towards the production of compounds that are beneficial for human health when that plant is part of the diet or the source of phytopharmaceutical compounds.

The first part of the book introduces the concept of Controlled Environment Horticulture as a horticultural production technique used to maximize yields via the optimization of access to growing factors. The second part describes the use of this production technique in order to induce stress responses in the plant via the modulation of these growing factors and, importantly, the way that this manipulation induces defence reactions in the plant resulting in the production of compounds beneficial for human health. The third part provides guidance for the implementation of this knowledge in horticultural production.

Keywords

Plant secondary metabolites Protected cropping Plant-based diet Biotic and abiotic environmental factors Sustainable development

Authors and affiliations

  • Christoph-Martin Geilfus
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Controlled Environment Horticulture, Faculty of Life SciencesAlbrecht Daniel Thaer-Institute of Agricultural and Horticultural Sciences, Humboldt-University of BerlinBerlinGermany

Bibliographic information