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Capture-Recapture: Parameter Estimation for Open Animal Populations

  • George A. F. Seber
  • Matthew R. Schofield
Book

Part of the Statistics for Biology and Health book series (SBH)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xix
  2. George A. F. Seber, Matthew R. Schofield
    Pages 1-11
  3. George A. F. Seber, Matthew R. Schofield
    Pages 13-37
  4. George A. F. Seber, Matthew R. Schofield
    Pages 39-95
  5. George A. F. Seber, Matthew R. Schofield
    Pages 97-109
  6. George A. F. Seber, Matthew R. Schofield
    Pages 111-172
  7. George A. F. Seber, Matthew R. Schofield
    Pages 173-209
  8. George A. F. Seber, Matthew R. Schofield
    Pages 211-255
  9. George A. F. Seber, Matthew R. Schofield
    Pages 257-308
  10. George A. F. Seber, Matthew R. Schofield
    Pages 309-329
  11. George A. F. Seber, Matthew R. Schofield
    Pages 331-343
  12. George A. F. Seber, Matthew R. Schofield
    Pages 345-383
  13. George A. F. Seber, Matthew R. Schofield
    Pages 385-404
  14. George A. F. Seber, Matthew R. Schofield
    Pages 405-489
  15. George A. F. Seber, Matthew R. Schofield
    Pages 491-521
  16. George A. F. Seber, Matthew R. Schofield
    Pages 523-565
  17. George A. F. Seber, Matthew R. Schofield
    Pages 567-570
  18. Back Matter
    Pages 571-663

About this book

Introduction

This  comprehensive book, rich with applications,  offers a quantitative framework for the analysis of the various capture-recapture models for open animal populations, while also addressing associated computational methods.

 The state of our wildlife populations provides a litmus test for the state of our environment, especially in light of global warming and the increasing pollution of our land, seas, and air. In addition to monitoring our food resources such as fisheries, we need to protect endangered species from the effects of human activities (e.g. rhinos, whales, or encroachments on the habitat of orangutans). Pests must be be controlled, whether insects or viruses, and we need to cope with growing feral populations such as opossums, rabbits, and pigs.

Accordingly, we need to obtain information about a given population’s dynamics, concerning e.g. mortality, birth, growth, breeding, sex, and migration, and determine whether the respective population is increasing , static, or declining. There are many methods for obtaining population information, but the most useful (and most work-intensive) is generically known as “capture-recapture,” where we mark or tag a representative sample of individuals from the population and follow that sample over time using recaptures, resightings, or dead recoveries. Marks can be natural, such as stripes, fin profiles, and even DNA; or artificial, such as spots on insects. Attached tags can, for example, be simple bands or streamers, or more sophisticated variants such as radio and sonic transmitters.

To estimate population parameters, sophisticated and complex mathematical models have been devised on the basis of recapture information and computer packages. This book addresses the analysis of such models. It is primarily intended for ecologists and wildlife managers who wish to apply the methods to the types of problems discussed above, though it will also benefit researchers and graduate students in ecology. Familiarity with basic statistical concepts is essential.


Keywords

Capture-mark-recapture Ring recovery data State-space models Survival estimation Animal migration Acoustic tags Genetic markers Cormack-Jolly –Seber models Time-series models Bayesian models GPS Monte Carlo Recapture Methods

Authors and affiliations

  • George A. F. Seber
    • 1
  • Matthew R. Schofield
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of StatisticsUniversity of AucklandAucklandNew Zealand
  2. 2.Department of Mathematics and StatisticsUniversity of OtagoDunedinNew Zealand

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-18187-1
  • Copyright Information Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019
  • Publisher Name Springer, Cham
  • eBook Packages Mathematics and Statistics
  • Print ISBN 978-3-030-18186-4
  • Online ISBN 978-3-030-18187-1
  • Series Print ISSN 1431-8776
  • Series Online ISSN 2197-5671
  • Buy this book on publisher's site