Advertisement

Structure Analysis by Small-Angle X-Ray and Neutron Scattering

  • L. A. Feigin
  • D. I. Svergun
  • George W. Taylor

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xiii
  2. Small-Angle Scattering and the Structure of Matter

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 1-1
    2. L. A. Feigin, D. I. Svergun, George W. Taylor
      Pages 3-24
    3. L. A. Feigin, D. I. Svergun, George W. Taylor
      Pages 25-55
  3. Monodisperse Systems

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 57-57
    2. L. A. Feigin, D. I. Svergun, George W. Taylor
      Pages 59-105
    3. L. A. Feigin, D. I. Svergun, George W. Taylor
      Pages 107-146
    4. L. A. Feigin, D. I. Svergun, George W. Taylor
      Pages 147-183
  4. Polymers and Inorganic Materials

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 185-185
    2. L. A. Feigin, D. I. Svergun, George W. Taylor
      Pages 187-218
    3. L. A. Feigin, D. I. Svergun, George W. Taylor
      Pages 219-245
  5. Instrumentation and Data Analysis

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 247-247
    2. L. A. Feigin, D. I. Svergun, George W. Taylor
      Pages 249-274
    3. L. A. Feigin, D. I. Svergun, George W. Taylor
      Pages 275-320
  6. Back Matter
    Pages 321-335

About this book

Introduction

Small-angle scattering of X rays and neutrons is a widely used diffraction method for studying the structure of matter. This method of elastic scattering is used in various branches of science and technology, includ­ ing condensed matter physics, molecular biology and biophysics, polymer science, and metallurgy. Many small-angle scattering studies are of value for pure science and practical applications. It is well known that the most general and informative method for investigating the spatial structure of matter is based on wave-diffraction phenomena. In diffraction experiments a primary beam of radiation influences a studied object, and the scattering pattern is analyzed. In principle, this analysis allows one to obtain information on the structure of a substance with a spatial resolution determined by the wavelength of the radiation. Diffraction methods are used for studying matter on all scales, from elementary particles to macro-objects. The use of X rays, neutrons, and electron beams, with wavelengths of about 1 A, permits the study of the condensed state of matter, solids and liquids, down to atomic resolution. Determination of the atomic structure of crystals, i.e., the arrangement of atoms in a unit cell, is an important example of this line of investigation.

Keywords

X-ray condensed matter condensed matter physics crystal electron molecular biology neutron diffraction polymer scattering

Authors and affiliations

  • L. A. Feigin
    • 1
  • D. I. Svergun
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of CrystallographyAcademy of Sciences of the USSRMoscowUSSR

Editors and affiliations

  • George W. Taylor
    • 1
  1. 1.Princeton ResourcesPrincetonUSA

Bibliographic information