Optical Studies in Liquids and Solids

  • Academician D. V. Skobel’tsyn

Part of the The Lebedev Physics Institute Series book series (LPIS, volume 39)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-ix
  2. Study of Second-Order Lines in the Vibrational Spectra of Molecules

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 1-4
    2. Academician D. V. Skobel’tsyn
      Pages 5-7
    3. Academician D. V. Skobel’tsyn
      Pages 8-13
    4. Academician D. V. Skobel’tsyn
      Pages 14-34
    5. Academician D. V. Skobel’tsyn
      Pages 35-42
  3. Study of the Rotational Oscillations of Molecules in Liquids by the Raman Method

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 49-51
    2. Academician D. V. Skobel’tsyn
      Pages 52-58
    3. Academician D. V. Skobel’tsyn
      Pages 59-61
  4. Study of the Optical and Electrical Properties of Certain Fourth-Group Metals

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 87-90
    2. Academician D. V. Skobel’tsyn
      Pages 91-95
    3. Academician D. V. Skobel’tsyn
      Pages 96-111
    4. Academician D. V. Skobel’tsyn
      Pages 112-120
    5. Academician D. V. Skobel’tsyn
      Pages 121-140
  5. Study of the Spectrum of Thermal and Stimulated Molecular Scattering of Light in Liquids

About this book

Introduction

The study of the vibrations of polyatomic molecules has recently turned into one of the most widespread and powerful methods of studying molecular structure. These vibrations ap­ pear directly in the infrared absorption spectra and Raman spectra of gases, liquids, and solids. A measurement of the number of bands in addition to their positions (frequencies or wavelengths) offers the possibility of obtaining a great deal of important information regarding the geometric and mechanical properties of the molecules, the types of chemical bonds, and so forth. It is now quite difficult to list the vast number of specific problems solved by measuring vibrational fre­ quencies. As a result of the successful development of research methods and the widespread applica­ tion of vibrational spectra in analyzing the structures of molecules and the constitution of ma­ terials, it now becomes necessary to develop the theory of molecular vibrations further. Existing theory, of course, is based on the assumption of the harmonicity of molecular vi­ brations, which, strictly speaking, is not justified experimentally. The anharmonicity of the molecular vibrations has therefore to be taken into account by introducing appropriate approxi­ mations. Thus, in carrying out calculations on the vibrations of polyatomic molecules, one uses the force constants calculated from the observed frequency values. However, as a result of the anharmonicity of the vibrations, the values of the observed frequencies differ from the harmonic values, and the force constants used therefore differ from the true ones, i. e.

Keywords

Vibration chemical bond collision development experiment information mechanical property molecule scattering sorption spectra structure

Editors and affiliations

  • Academician D. V. Skobel’tsyn
    • 1
  1. 1.P. N. Lebedev Physics InstituteAcademy of Sciences of the USSRMoscowRussia

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4684-8724-4
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag US 1969
  • Publisher Name Springer, Boston, MA
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-1-4684-8726-8
  • Online ISBN 978-1-4684-8724-4
  • About this book