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Handbook of LEGUMES of World Economic Importance

  • James A. Duke

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xi
  2. James A. Duke
    Pages 1-4
  3. James A. Duke
    Pages 5-310
  4. Back Matter
    Pages 311-345

About this book

Introduction

In 1971, Dr. Quentin Jones, now of the National Hawaii, where an international panel convened to Program Staff, SEA, USDA, suggested that the discuss and assemble information on underexploit­ Plant Taxonomy Laboratory devise a format for ed tropical legumes. Conversations at that meeting concise write-ups on 1,000 economic plants (Duke and subsequent correspondence with the partici­ and Terrell, 1974; Duke et al. , 1975). Dr. C. F. pants also yielded new information on some of the Reed was contracted to search the literature on tropical legumes. Finally in 1978, 100 copies of the writeups these economic plants, which included 146 species of legumes. From 1971 through 1974, Dr. Reed were delivered to the International Legume Con­ prepared rough drafts of write-ups on the 1,000 ference at Kew, July 24th-August 4, and all were species. It was my responsibility to establish the given to potential cooperators before my lecture on format and monitor the write-ups, to ensure that the manual (July 31st). New information presented they would answer many questions on legumes in lectures at that conference and personal com­ directed to the USDA by our taxpaying public. munications behind the scenes have also been used Since then, a computerized system alerts me to to update and embellish the write-ups so that they new publications on legumes. I have ordered for are more than a bibliographic echo. our files copies of the more promising documents.

Keywords

information plant plants system taxonomy

Authors and affiliations

  • James A. Duke
    • 1
  1. 1.United States Department of AgricultureBeltsvilleUSA

Bibliographic information