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A choice of futures

  • Fred Emery
  • Merrelyn Emery

Part of the International series on the quality of working life book series (IQWL, volume 4)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages I-X
  2. A model of man as communicator

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 1-1
    2. Fred Emery, Merrelyn Emery
      Pages 3-4
    3. Fred Emery, Merrelyn Emery
      Pages 5-15
    4. Fred Emery, Merrelyn Emery
      Pages 19-26
    5. Fred Emery, Merrelyn Emery
      Pages 27-32
    6. Fred Emery, Merrelyn Emery
      Pages 33-41
  3. The modern media and man

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 43-43
    2. Fred Emery, Merrelyn Emery
      Pages 64-71
    3. Fred Emery, Merrelyn Emery
      Pages 72-94
    4. Fred Emery, Merrelyn Emery
      Pages 95-108
    5. Fred Emery, Merrelyn Emery
      Pages 109-121
    6. Fred Emery, Merrelyn Emery
      Pages 122-144
  4. Human communication and the adaptive response

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 145-145
    2. Fred Emery, Merrelyn Emery
      Pages 147-165
    3. Fred Emery, Merrelyn Emery
      Pages 166-178
    4. Fred Emery, Merrelyn Emery
      Pages 179-190
    5. Fred Emery, Merrelyn Emery
      Pages 191-199
    6. Fred Emery, Merrelyn Emery
      Pages 200-200
  5. Back Matter
    Pages 201-212

About this book

Introduction

Exploration of the nature of human communication and the media is a pre­ requisite to any assessment of the likely future role of communications . . We cannot assume that the nature of these things is transparently obvious to everyone and therefore commonly understood. Three developments in recent decades should adequately warn against such an assumption. First, we had the fiasco of social scientists trying to apply Shannon's mathematical theory of information as if it were a theory of human communication. 'In Shannon's use of information we cannot speak of how much information a person has only how much a message has. ' (Ackoff and Emery, 1972, p. 145). They would not have wandered into that blind alley if they had stopped to think about the nature of human communication. Second was the belated but wholehearted acceptance of the Heider theory of balance and its subse­ quent wane. Its wane had nothing to do with its inherent merits. It waned because it could not survive on the Procrustean bed of the psychologists' theory of choice. It did not occur to the psychologists to question their as­ sumptions about how people made the choices that lead to purposeful com­ munication (Ackoff and Emery, 1972, p. 58). The last example has been the bitter and unended furore about McLuhan. This time the psychologists and sociologists haye been strangely quiet but we can be sure this does not imply acquiescence in McLuhan's views.

Keywords

Computer Design Mode assessment communication development education environment information mass media media missing link nature organization television

Authors and affiliations

  • Fred Emery
    • 1
  • Merrelyn Emery
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre for Continuing EducationANUCanberraAustralia

Bibliographic information