Cognitive Approaches to Neuropsychology

  • J. Michael Williams
  • Charles J. Long

Part of the Human Neuropsychology book series (HN)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-1
  2. Debra L. Long, Arthur C. Graesser, Charles J. Long
    Pages 3-26
  3. Jennifer Sandson, Bruce Crosson, Michael I. Posner, Peggy P. Barco, Craig A. Velozo, Teresa C. Brobeck
    Pages 45-59
  4. Jill Booker, Daniel L. Schacter
    Pages 61-81
  5. Kurt A. Moehle, Jeffrey L. Rasmussen, Kathleen B. Fitzhugh-Bell
    Pages 143-167
  6. Murry G. Mutchnick
    Pages 169-187
  7. Randolph W. Parks, David A. Loewenstein, Jen Y. Chang
    Pages 189-210
  8. Susan Kotler-Cope, Fredda Blanchard-Fields, Wm. Drew Gouvier
    Pages 287-306
  9. William W. Beatty
    Pages 307-315
  10. Robert L. Pusakulich, Geri R. Alvis, Jeannette P. Ward
    Pages 317-330
  11. Walter F. Daniel
    Pages 331-355
  12. Back Matter
    Pages 357-361

About this book

Introduction

Since its early development, neuropsychology has examined the manner in which cognitive abilities are mediated by the brain. fudeed, all of neuropsy­ chology, and especially clinical neuropsychology, could be subsumed under this general investigation. However, a variety of factors impeded the close as­ sociation of neuropsychologists and cognitive/experimental psychologists. These factors were prominent influences in both camps, which kept the study of cognition away from a consideration of biological foundations and kept neuropsychology theoretically impoverished. In recent years, these factors have diminished and "cognitive neuropsychology" has become a popular term to describe the new movements to join the study of cognition with the study of brain function. The factors which kept these areas separate were manifestations of his­ torical trends and represent a social distance which largely happened by acci­ dent. The first and perhaps most important factor was that early investigators of cognition and brain function were not psychologists. Most were neurolo­ gists or otlier neuroscientists who were excellent observers of behavior fol­ lowing brain injury but had virtually no theoretical context of cognitive psy­ chology, which would allow them to expand and deepen their understanding of the behavior they were observing. As more psychologists who have such a context have observed the consequences of brain disorders, especially aphasia and amnesia, the study of them has become far more comprehensive as theo­ ries of language and memory derived from cognitive psychology have been incorporated into the investigations.

Keywords

behavior brain brain injury clinical neuropsychology cognition cognitive psychology memory neuropsychology psychology

Editors and affiliations

  • J. Michael Williams
    • 1
  • Charles J. Long
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Mental Health SciencesHahnemann Medical UniversityPhiladelphiaUSA
  2. 2.Memphis State University and University of Tennessee Center for the Health SciencesMemphisUSA

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4684-5577-9
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag US 1988
  • Publisher Name Springer, Boston, MA
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-1-4684-5579-3
  • Online ISBN 978-1-4684-5577-9
  • About this book