Mechanisms of Cerebral Hypoxia and Stroke

  • George Somjen

Part of the Advances in Behavioral Biology book series (ABBI, volume 35)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xii
  2. Adaptation in Diving Vertebrates

  3. General Pathology

    1. Takaaki Kirino, Akira Tamura, Keiji Sano
      Pages 23-34
    2. Flemming Fryd Johansen, Jens Zimmer, Nils Henrik Diemer
      Pages 49-49
    3. Eva Valente, Flemming Fryd Johansen, Nils Henrik Diemer
      Pages 51-51
    4. Maj-Lis Smith, Bo K. Siesjö
      Pages 57-71
    5. W. Meier-Ruge, D. Theodore, J. Abraham
      Pages 73-81
    6. Rainald Schmidt-Kastner, Wulf Paschen, Janus Szymas, Konstantin-Alexander Hossmann
      Pages 83-90
  4. Pathophysiology

    1. Eors Dora, Arisztid G. B. Kovach, Joel H. Greenberg, Kortaro Tanaka, Nicholas H. Gonatas, Martin Reivich
      Pages 119-133
    2. Y. E. Moskalenko, G. B. Weinstein, V. E. Parfenov, M. Bodó, B. V. Gaidar
      Pages 135-136
    3. Norman R. Kreisman
      Pages 139-149
    4. Alfred Lehmenkühler, Heinz Caspers, Erwin-Josef Speckmann, Dieter Bingmann, Hans G. Lipinski, Ulrich Kersting
      Pages 153-164
    5. Anker Jon Hansen
      Pages 165-173

About this book

Introduction

The articles and short communications in this volume are based on papers pre­ sented to the Symposium on Cerebral Hypoxia and Stroke held in Budapest in August of 1987. Besides participants at the meeting, three scientists who were invited but could not attend have also contributed chapters to this volume. A synopsis of the general discussion at the conference and a review chapter conclude this volume. To the readers of this book it will not be news that stroke is a worldwide problem. Efforts to cope with this often devastating condition are worldwide also, as attested by the international membership of the conference. It has been said of oxygen deficiency that it not only stops the machine, it also wrecks the machinery. The paramount question in stroke research is this: why can't the brain be restarted after a hypoxic episode in much the same manner as a motor car can when its gas tank is refilled after it stalled because it ran out of fuel? Participants at the Symposium had been requested in advance of the meeting to especially consider a series of specific questions in relation to this general problem. Among these specific questions were: the mechanism of synaptic blockade in hypoxic brain tissue; the transition from reversible to irreversible arrest of function; the nature of postischemic (delayed) cell death; the possible basic differences in the consequences of hypoxia and ischemia; and actual and potential approaches to the prevention and treatment of cell damage in hypoxia and stroke.

Keywords

brain cell cell death cortex oxygen paper physiology receptor tissue

Editors and affiliations

  • George Somjen
    • 1
  1. 1.Duke University Medical CenterDurhamUSA

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4684-5562-5
  • Copyright Information Plenum Press, New York 1988
  • Publisher Name Springer, Boston, MA
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-1-4684-5564-9
  • Online ISBN 978-1-4684-5562-5
  • Series Print ISSN 0099-6246
  • About this book