Exploring the Unknown

Great Mysteries Reexamined

  • Charles J. Cazeau
  • Stuart D. ScottJr.

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xi
  2. Introduction

    1. Charles J. Cazeau, Stuart D. Scott Jr.
      Pages 1-13
  3. Diffusion and Superdiffusion

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 15-16
    2. Charles J. Cazeau, Stuart D. Scott Jr.
      Pages 17-28
    3. Charles J. Cazeau, Stuart D. Scott Jr.
      Pages 29-62
    4. Charles J. Cazeau, Stuart D. Scott Jr.
      Pages 63-67
    5. Charles J. Cazeau, Stuart D. Scott Jr.
      Pages 69-88
    6. Charles J. Cazeau, Stuart D. Scott Jr.
      Pages 89-103
  4. Strange Stone Monuments

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 105-106
    2. Charles J. Cazeau, Stuart D. Scott Jr.
      Pages 107-126
    3. Charles J. Cazeau, Stuart D. Scott Jr.
      Pages 127-148
    4. Charles J. Cazeau, Stuart D. Scott Jr.
      Pages 149-168
  5. Marine Mysteries

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 169-169
    2. Charles J. Cazeau, Stuart D. Scott Jr.
      Pages 171-186
    3. Charles J. Cazeau, Stuart D. Scott Jr.
      Pages 187-202
  6. Monsters, Stars, and Catastrophists

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 203-203
    2. Charles J. Cazeau, Stuart D. Scott Jr.
      Pages 205-223
    3. Charles J. Cazeau, Stuart D. Scott Jr.
      Pages 225-237
    4. Charles J. Cazeau, Stuart D. Scott Jr.
      Pages 239-258
    5. Charles J. Cazeau, Stuart D. Scott Jr.
      Pages 259-268

About this book

Introduction

The purpose of this book is to explore some of those great mysteries of the earth that have captured the popular imagination, and especially those having their roots in our specialties of archaeology and geology. The average reader probably is unfamiliar with the earth sciences or the archaeological history of man. Nor does the average reader have the time and literary resources to verify all he or she reads. Our aim is to lend a helping hand by examining the evidence that surrounds such mysteries as the legend of Atlantis and the ruins of Stonehenge, and, as logically as we can, sift truth from falsehood and exagger­ ation. Early man found himself in a world of unimaginable mysteries: meteors streaking across a star-studded sky, the darkness beyond the campfire's glow, the sound and fury of a volcano's eruption. Our earliest ancestors were probably mysteries to themselves, and totally susceptible to the subjectivity of their world. Fantasies may have been as much a formative influence as toolmaking in the early development of culture. As human beings gathered knowledge and understanding of their surroundings, old mysteries vanished, only to be replaced by others because so much was not understood.

Keywords

culture development knowledge

Authors and affiliations

  • Charles J. Cazeau
    • 1
  • Stuart D. ScottJr.
    • 1
  1. 1.State University of New York at BuffaloAmherstUSA

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4684-3533-7
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag US 1979
  • Publisher Name Springer, Boston, MA
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-1-4684-3535-1
  • Online ISBN 978-1-4684-3533-7
  • About this book