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Parenteral Nutrition in Infancy and Childhood

  • Hans Henning Bode
  • Joseph B. Warshaw

Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 46)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xi
  2. The History of Parenteral Alimentation

  3. The Regulation of Energy Intake by Developing and Adult Animals

  4. Factors Influencing Amino Acid Utilization

    1. Hamish N. Munro
      Pages 11-26
  5. Amino Acid Requirements in Childhood

    1. D. M. Hegsted
      Pages 27-37
  6. Intravenous Carbohydrate Tolerance in Infancy

  7. Substrate Supply and Utilization in Various Conditions

  8. The Utilization of Xylitol, Fructose and Sorbitol

  9. Fatty Acid Oxidation during Development

    1. Joseph B. Warshaw
      Pages 88-97
  10. Utilization and Tolerance of Intravenous Fat Emulsions

  11. Alcohol Metabolism during Development

    1. Esteban Mezey
      Pages 112-118
  12. Fluid and Electrolyte Requirements and Tolerance

    1. John D. Crawford
      Pages 119-130
  13. Trace Elements and Vitamins

    1. Harry L. Greene, Michael Hambidge, Yaye F. Herman
      Pages 131-145
  14. The Rapid Rehabilitation of Severely Undernourished Children

  15. Technique of Total Parenteral Nutrition in Infants

    1. Stanley J. Dudrick, Bruce V. MacFadyen, Robert W. Winters
      Pages 151-164
  16. Postoperative Parenteral Feeding of Neonates: Peripheral Vein Infusion Technique, Fat Administration and Metabolic Studies

  17. Controlled Parenteral Nutrition of Premature Infants

    1. P. Jürgens, D. Dolif, C. Panteliadis, C. Hofert
      Pages 178-198
  18. Total Intravenous Alimentation in Low Birth Weight Premature Infants

    1. William C. Heird, John M. Driscoll Jr., Robert W. Winters
      Pages 199-205
  19. Intrauterine Amino Acid Feeding of the Fetus

  20. The Role and Effect of Parenteral Nutrition on the Liver and Its Use in Chronic Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Childhood

    1. Michael I. Cohen, Scott J. Boley, Fred Daum, Iris F. Litt, S. Kenneth Schonberg
      Pages 214-224
  21. Parenteral Nutrition of Renal Disease

    1. Josef E. Fischer
      Pages 225-230
  22. Parenteral Nutrition in Critical Illness

    1. John T. Herrin
      Pages 231-238
  23. Parenteral Nutrition in Children with Burns

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 239-239
    2. Martin P. Popp, Edward J. Law, Bruce G. MacMillan
      Pages 240-246
    3. Alia Antoon, Hans Henning Bode
      Pages 247-249
    4. C. Burri, H. H. Pässler
      Pages 250-255
    5. William C. Heird, Robert W. Winters, Stanley J. Dudrick
      Pages 256-268
    6. Murray F. Brennan
      Pages 269-278
  24. Back Matter
    Pages 279-307

About this book

Introduction

"A tranquil mind puts flesh on a man" English proverb After aperiod of relative neglect, nutrition as a medical science is now an area of great clinical and investigative activ­ ity. This renewed interest in clinical nutrition derives in large part from observations suggesting that early nutritional depriva­ tion not only interferes with the maintenance of health, growth and resistance to disease but if present during critical periods of central nervous system development may also cause permanent impairment of intellectual capacity. Studies on brain development during malnutrition have contin­ ued to demonstrate the vulnerability of the developing brain to nutritional insult. Winick (1968) has emphasized that nutritional deficiency occurring while cells of the central nervous system are actively dividing results in a permanent decrease in central ner­ vous system cell number. Later nutritional deficiency which re­ sults in decrease in cell size appears to be recoverable. Perhaps even more important than effects of malnutrition on brain cell number is the effect on brain protein synthesis and myelination. As different regions of the prain grow at different rates and human cerebellar and cerebral cell number increase for the first few months of life, newborn nutritional deficiency may compromise brain development. Dobbing (1973) has focused attention on the vulnerability of the brain to nutritional insult during the brain growth spurt which occurs around the time of birth. In the human, this period extends throughout the third trimester of pregnancy and into the second postnatal year.

Keywords

Vitamin alcohol amino acid brain cell cells children fat growth health nervous system nutrition protein synthesis resistance system

Editors and affiliations

  • Hans Henning Bode
    • 1
  • Joseph B. Warshaw
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Shriners Burns InstituteMassachusetts General HospitalBostonUSA
  2. 2.Departments of Pediatrics, Obstetrics, and GynecologyYale University School of MedicineNew HavenUSA

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4684-3249-7
  • Copyright Information Springer Science+Business Media New York 1974
  • Publisher Name Springer, Boston, MA
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-1-4684-3251-0
  • Online ISBN 978-1-4684-3249-7
  • Series Print ISSN 0065-2598
  • Buy this book on publisher's site